The 38-percent solution: Empirical generalizations for repeat viewing of television programs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Repeat viewing is commonly used as an indication of program loyalty. The authors extended the pioneering work by Ehrenberg, Barwise, and Goodhardt by examining a unique dataset of prime time television shows that change time in midseason. These data help to unravel the difference between loyalty to programs and loyalty to particular time periods. For example, across 42 different datasets of programs that changed time, the authors calculated repeat viewing levels for the four weeks before and after the change. A resulting empirical generalization was that repeat viewing is 38 percent-both before and after the time change. This generalization is true across all program types, and even when a program changes day. In addition, a surprising finding is that many programs retain their share of audience when moved to a new time slot.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)225 - 233
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Advertising Research
Volume52
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Cite this

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The 38-percent solution: Empirical generalizations for repeat viewing of television programs. / Danaher, Peter Joseph; Dagger, Tracey Sara.

In: Journal of Advertising Research, Vol. 52, No. 2, 2012, p. 225 - 233.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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