Tennis elbow

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearchpeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Lateral pain in the elbow affects up to 3% of the population, and is considered an overload injury of the extensor tendons of the forearm where they attach at the lateral epicondyle. Although usually self-limiting, symptoms may persist for over 1 year in up to 20% of people.

METHODS AND OUTCOMES: We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for tennis elbow? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to August 2006 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA).

RESULTS: We found 30 systematic reviews, RCTs or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions.

CONCLUSIONS: In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, corticosteroid injections, exercise and mobilisation, extracorporeal shock wave therapy, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (oral and topical), orthoses (bracing), and surgery.

Original languageEnglish
JournalBMJ clinical evidence
Volume2008
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2008

Cite this

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title = "Tennis elbow",
abstract = "INTRODUCTION: Lateral pain in the elbow affects up to 3{\%} of the population, and is considered an overload injury of the extensor tendons of the forearm where they attach at the lateral epicondyle. Although usually self-limiting, symptoms may persist for over 1 year in up to 20{\%} of people.METHODS AND OUTCOMES: We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for tennis elbow? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to August 2006 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA).RESULTS: We found 30 systematic reviews, RCTs or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions.CONCLUSIONS: In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, corticosteroid injections, exercise and mobilisation, extracorporeal shock wave therapy, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (oral and topical), orthoses (bracing), and surgery.",
author = "Rachelle Buchbinder and Green, {Sally E.lizabeth} and Peter Struijs",
year = "2008",
month = "1",
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language = "English",
volume = "2008",
journal = "Clinical Evidence",
issn = "1462-3846",

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Tennis elbow. / Buchbinder, Rachelle; Green, Sally E.lizabeth; Struijs, Peter.

In: BMJ clinical evidence, Vol. 2008, 01.01.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Tennis elbow

AU - Buchbinder, Rachelle

AU - Green, Sally E.lizabeth

AU - Struijs, Peter

PY - 2008/1/1

Y1 - 2008/1/1

N2 - INTRODUCTION: Lateral pain in the elbow affects up to 3% of the population, and is considered an overload injury of the extensor tendons of the forearm where they attach at the lateral epicondyle. Although usually self-limiting, symptoms may persist for over 1 year in up to 20% of people.METHODS AND OUTCOMES: We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for tennis elbow? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to August 2006 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA).RESULTS: We found 30 systematic reviews, RCTs or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions.CONCLUSIONS: In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, corticosteroid injections, exercise and mobilisation, extracorporeal shock wave therapy, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (oral and topical), orthoses (bracing), and surgery.

AB - INTRODUCTION: Lateral pain in the elbow affects up to 3% of the population, and is considered an overload injury of the extensor tendons of the forearm where they attach at the lateral epicondyle. Although usually self-limiting, symptoms may persist for over 1 year in up to 20% of people.METHODS AND OUTCOMES: We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for tennis elbow? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to August 2006 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA).RESULTS: We found 30 systematic reviews, RCTs or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions.CONCLUSIONS: In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, corticosteroid injections, exercise and mobilisation, extracorporeal shock wave therapy, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (oral and topical), orthoses (bracing), and surgery.

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M3 - Review Article

C2 - 19450309

AN - SCOPUS:84964994112

VL - 2008

JO - Clinical Evidence

JF - Clinical Evidence

SN - 1462-3846

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