Teaching and assessing EIL vocabulary in Hong Kong

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (Book)Researchpeer-review

Abstract

Hong Kong is one of the outer circle regions in Kachru s (The other tongue: English across cultures. University of Illinois Press, Urbana, 1982) threeconcentric- circle model. It is also a bi-literate (Chinese and English) and trilingual (Cantonese, Putonghua, and English) region where English is one of the official languages. English is regarded as an international language in Hong Kong, based on McKay s (Teaching English as an international language: Rethinking goals and approaches. Oxford University Press, Oxford/New York, p 5, 2002) definition that EIL is a language of wider communication both among individuals from different countries and between individuals from one country . Teaching and assessing English vocabulary in such a context requires teachers and learners to be aware of the global and local cultural conceptualizations (Sharitian 2011) involved in the English word formation processes and lexical relations. Tomlinson (Which test of which English and why? In: Kirkpatrick A ( ed) The Routledge handbook of world Englishes. Routledge, London/New York, p 610, 2010) proposes learnercentred criteria, including both universal criteria and local criteria in English teaching and assessment. Kirkpatrick (World Englishes: Implications for international communication and English language teaching. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, p 195, 2007) summarizes a set of requirements for ELT teachers who wish to work in outer and expanding circle countries. These recent developments in ELT have implications for vocabulary teaching and assessment in Hong Kong. In this paper, I shall take EIL as a theoretical framework and reflect critically on the principles of ElL vocabulary teaching, and strategies for vocabulary learning in relation to the local linguistic landscape and learners mindscape in Hong Kong.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Pedagogy of English as an International Language: Perspectives from Scholars, Teachers and Students
EditorsRoby Marlina, Ram Ashish Giri
Place of PublicationCham Switzerland
PublisherSpringer
Pages143 - 156
Number of pages14
ISBN (Print)9783319061269
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Cite this

Xu, Z. (2014). Teaching and assessing EIL vocabulary in Hong Kong. In R. Marlina, & R. A. Giri (Eds.), The Pedagogy of English as an International Language: Perspectives from Scholars, Teachers and Students (pp. 143 - 156). Cham Switzerland: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-06127-6_10
Xu, Zhichang. / Teaching and assessing EIL vocabulary in Hong Kong. The Pedagogy of English as an International Language: Perspectives from Scholars, Teachers and Students. editor / Roby Marlina ; Ram Ashish Giri. Cham Switzerland : Springer, 2014. pp. 143 - 156
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Xu, Z 2014, Teaching and assessing EIL vocabulary in Hong Kong. in R Marlina & RA Giri (eds), The Pedagogy of English as an International Language: Perspectives from Scholars, Teachers and Students. Springer, Cham Switzerland, pp. 143 - 156. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-06127-6_10

Teaching and assessing EIL vocabulary in Hong Kong. / Xu, Zhichang.

The Pedagogy of English as an International Language: Perspectives from Scholars, Teachers and Students. ed. / Roby Marlina; Ram Ashish Giri. Cham Switzerland : Springer, 2014. p. 143 - 156.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (Book)Researchpeer-review

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Xu Z. Teaching and assessing EIL vocabulary in Hong Kong. In Marlina R, Giri RA, editors, The Pedagogy of English as an International Language: Perspectives from Scholars, Teachers and Students. Cham Switzerland: Springer. 2014. p. 143 - 156 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-06127-6_10