Tandem stenosis to induce atherosclerotic plaque instability in the mouse

Yung Chih Chen, Jennifer Rivera, Karlheinz Peter

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (Book)Otherpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite the number of animal models of atherosclerosis, a major limitation in research on mechanisms of plaque rupture is the lack of appropriate atherosclerotic mouse models where lesions develop and progress to a vulnerable and thus rupture-prone phenotype that is typically observed in humans. Most animal models of atherosclerosis typically represent a few but not the full combination of the characteristics seen in human unstable/ruptured plaques. Such characteristics most importantly include a thin and ruptured fibrous cap, plaque inflammation, neovascularization within the plaque (vasa vasorum), plaque hemorrhage, and intravascular (often occlusive) thrombus formation. Ideally, an animal model of plaque instability/rupture would respond to current pharmacological interventions known to reduce the risk of plaque rupture, such as statins. Here we describe a mouse model of plaque instability/rupture that is based on the surgical introduction of a tandem stenosis in the carotid artery. This model results in the formation of unstable atherosclerotic plaques that reflect human plaque pathology. It will allow to further understanding of plaque instability/rupture, to identify the participating factors such as specific proteins, genes and microRNAs, and to develop imaging methods towards the detection of vulnerable, rupture-prone atherosclerotic plaques

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMethods in Molecular Biology
EditorsVicente Andres, Beatriz Dorado
Place of PublicationNew York NY USA
PublisherHumana Press
Chapter23
Pages333-338
Number of pages6
Volume1339
ISBN (Electronic)9781493929290
ISBN (Print)9781493929283
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Publication series

NameMethods in Molecular Biology
Volume1339
ISSN (Print)1064-3745

Keywords

  • Acute myocardial infarction
  • Angiogenesis animal models of human disease
  • Arterial thrombosis
  • Atherosclerosis
  • Gene expression profiling
  • Inflammation
  • MicroRNA profiling
  • Plaque rupture

Cite this