Supply chain risk management framework: Alcoholic Glass Beverages

Research output: Book/ReportCommissioned ReportResearch

Abstract

BACKGROUND
Research has identified a clear a gap in workplace safety risk management tools being propagated and used along supply chains [1]. Although employees are typically considered the key asset - and therefore the major priority - of an organisation, workplace safety practices are a seldom considered as a source of risk to supply chain management [2, 3]. In response, many researchers have argued that that our understanding of supply chains and associated OHS risks is still in its infancy [4, 5]. The aim of this study was to explore safety risks across the supply chain for alcoholic glass beverage products (both empty and full). This includes alcoholic glass beverage products which are either: imported or produced and manufactured locally; packaged; and distributed in, or from, the state of Victoria. The project intended to identify and map the key safety risk ‘pressure points’ along the supply chain.
METHODS
Individuals in selected high-risk occupations across the supply chain for alcoholic glass beverages were interviewed to map the safety risks associated with work-role tasks onto Ramussen’s risk management framework. A second step was to apply the Accimap technique to identify the key contributing factors of risk across the alcoholic glass beverage products’ supply chain. The resulting safety risk framework illustrated the ‘pressure points’ within the industry supply chain.
SUMMARY OF FINDINGS
Contributing factors across all levels of the risk management framework were reported in the interviews. The majority of factors influencing safety performance were at the higher levels of the system, including the Company, Management, and Government levels. At the Company level, factors included profitability and targets, investment in workforce training and development, and employment and subcontracting arrangements. At the Management level, factors included health and safety training and workforce standards, and productivity targets. At the Government level, factors included criminal law and enforcement priorities, and allocation of policing resources). It was also identified that behaviours are shaped by interactions between factors across and within levels of the supply chain. For example, while safety policy and procedures are in place, during busy times, procedures are not followed as the driving factor is meeting performance targets. Given so few of the influential factors were identified at the worker level, a reductionist (i.e., worker-focused) view of safety prevention is unlikely to inform effective intervention or policy development.
The results also identified several intervention opportunities spanning multiple levels of the risk management framework. However, the findings also suggest that interventions conducted in isolation are unlikely to be successful unless actors across all levels of the system support their implementation.
LIMITATIONS
The whole of supply chain for alcoholic glass beverages is complex and has a number of interdependencies. Thus, in the current study it was only possible to focus on high risk occupations, which may not reflect the risks across the whole of the supply chain. Further, given the small number of participants and the focus on Victorian organisations, it was not possible to explore in detail the issues of varying OHS standards and practices across the full supply chain, particularly when interstate or international organisations are involved.
CONCLUSIONS
The findings from this study suggest that safety along the supply chain for alcoholic glass beverages is a systems-based problem, and thus a holistic approach to intervention is required to ensure the safety of workers in the system. The results identified several intervention opportunities spanning multiple levels of the risk management framework, with the majority of factors influencing safety performance occurring at higher levels of the system (e.g., Company, Management, and Government levels). This indicates that a reductionist (i.e., worker-focused) view of safety prevention is unlikely to inform effective intervention or policy development, and interventions conducted in isolation are unlikely to be successful unless actors across all levels of the system support their implementation.
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationMelbourne, Australia
PublisherInstitute for Safety, Compensation and Recovery Research (ISCRR)
Commissioning bodySafe Work Australia and WorkSafe Victoria
Number of pages40
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Keywords

  • Occupational health and safety
  • Safety management

Cite this

Muir, C. P., Newnam, S., & Thompson, J. (2018). Supply chain risk management framework: Alcoholic Glass Beverages. Institute for Safety, Compensation and Recovery Research (ISCRR).