Suitability of nitinol electrodes in neural prostheses such as endovascular neural interfaces

Yan T. Wong, Nicholas L. Opie, Sam E. John, Giulia Gerboni, Gil S. Rind, Stephen M. Ronayne, Kate E. Fox, Thomas J. Oxley, David B. Grayden

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference PaperResearchpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A major challenge facing neural prostheses is the development of electrodes that are well tolerated by the brain and body. A novel way to circumvent the need to perform an invasive craniotomy and penetration of the blood-brain barrier to implant electrodes, is to guide electrodes up into the cerebral veins and place electrodes on the vessel walls adjacent to neuronal populations. To aid in the development of these stent based devices, microelectrodes manufactured from Nitinol would allow electrodes to be implanted via a catheter and then once deployed, alter their shape to conform to the vessel walls. However, there is a paucity of data on whether Nitinol is a suitable material to record neural signals. Here we show that Nitinol is tolerated by the body and that it can effectively measure neural signals. Specifically, we electrochemically evaluate Nitinol electrodes in blood and record visually evoked potentials from sheep.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2016 38th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC 2016)
EditorsJose Principe, Jose Carmena, Justin Sanchez
Place of PublicationPiscataway NJ USA
PublisherIEEE, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
Pages4463-4466
Number of pages4
ISBN (Electronic)9781457702204
ISBN (Print)9781457702198
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016
Externally publishedYes
EventInternational Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society 2016: Empowering Individual Healthcare Decisions through Technology - Walt Disney World Resort, Orlando, United States of America
Duration: 16 Aug 201620 Aug 2016
Conference number: 38
https://embc.embs.org/2016/

Conference

ConferenceInternational Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society 2016
Abbreviated titleEMBC 2016
CountryUnited States of America
CityOrlando
Period16/08/1620/08/16
Internet address

Cite this

Wong, Y. T., Opie, N. L., John, S. E., Gerboni, G., Rind, G. S., Ronayne, S. M., ... Grayden, D. B. (2016). Suitability of nitinol electrodes in neural prostheses such as endovascular neural interfaces. In J. Principe, J. Carmena, & J. Sanchez (Eds.), 2016 38th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC 2016) (pp. 4463-4466). Piscataway NJ USA: IEEE, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. https://doi.org/10.1109/EMBC.2016.7591718
Wong, Yan T. ; Opie, Nicholas L. ; John, Sam E. ; Gerboni, Giulia ; Rind, Gil S. ; Ronayne, Stephen M. ; Fox, Kate E. ; Oxley, Thomas J. ; Grayden, David B. / Suitability of nitinol electrodes in neural prostheses such as endovascular neural interfaces. 2016 38th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC 2016) . editor / Jose Principe ; Jose Carmena ; Justin Sanchez. Piscataway NJ USA : IEEE, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, 2016. pp. 4463-4466
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title = "Suitability of nitinol electrodes in neural prostheses such as endovascular neural interfaces",
abstract = "A major challenge facing neural prostheses is the development of electrodes that are well tolerated by the brain and body. A novel way to circumvent the need to perform an invasive craniotomy and penetration of the blood-brain barrier to implant electrodes, is to guide electrodes up into the cerebral veins and place electrodes on the vessel walls adjacent to neuronal populations. To aid in the development of these stent based devices, microelectrodes manufactured from Nitinol would allow electrodes to be implanted via a catheter and then once deployed, alter their shape to conform to the vessel walls. However, there is a paucity of data on whether Nitinol is a suitable material to record neural signals. Here we show that Nitinol is tolerated by the body and that it can effectively measure neural signals. Specifically, we electrochemically evaluate Nitinol electrodes in blood and record visually evoked potentials from sheep.",
author = "Wong, {Yan T.} and Opie, {Nicholas L.} and John, {Sam E.} and Giulia Gerboni and Rind, {Gil S.} and Ronayne, {Stephen M.} and Fox, {Kate E.} and Oxley, {Thomas J.} and Grayden, {David B.}",
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Wong, YT, Opie, NL, John, SE, Gerboni, G, Rind, GS, Ronayne, SM, Fox, KE, Oxley, TJ & Grayden, DB 2016, Suitability of nitinol electrodes in neural prostheses such as endovascular neural interfaces. in J Principe, J Carmena & J Sanchez (eds), 2016 38th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC 2016) . IEEE, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Piscataway NJ USA, pp. 4463-4466, International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society 2016, Orlando, United States of America, 16/08/16. https://doi.org/10.1109/EMBC.2016.7591718

Suitability of nitinol electrodes in neural prostheses such as endovascular neural interfaces. / Wong, Yan T.; Opie, Nicholas L.; John, Sam E.; Gerboni, Giulia; Rind, Gil S.; Ronayne, Stephen M.; Fox, Kate E.; Oxley, Thomas J.; Grayden, David B.

2016 38th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC 2016) . ed. / Jose Principe; Jose Carmena; Justin Sanchez. Piscataway NJ USA : IEEE, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, 2016. p. 4463-4466.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference PaperResearchpeer-review

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AU - Opie, Nicholas L.

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AU - Gerboni, Giulia

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AB - A major challenge facing neural prostheses is the development of electrodes that are well tolerated by the brain and body. A novel way to circumvent the need to perform an invasive craniotomy and penetration of the blood-brain barrier to implant electrodes, is to guide electrodes up into the cerebral veins and place electrodes on the vessel walls adjacent to neuronal populations. To aid in the development of these stent based devices, microelectrodes manufactured from Nitinol would allow electrodes to be implanted via a catheter and then once deployed, alter their shape to conform to the vessel walls. However, there is a paucity of data on whether Nitinol is a suitable material to record neural signals. Here we show that Nitinol is tolerated by the body and that it can effectively measure neural signals. Specifically, we electrochemically evaluate Nitinol electrodes in blood and record visually evoked potentials from sheep.

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Wong YT, Opie NL, John SE, Gerboni G, Rind GS, Ronayne SM et al. Suitability of nitinol electrodes in neural prostheses such as endovascular neural interfaces. In Principe J, Carmena J, Sanchez J, editors, 2016 38th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC 2016) . Piscataway NJ USA: IEEE, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. 2016. p. 4463-4466 https://doi.org/10.1109/EMBC.2016.7591718