Sub-dissociative dose intranasal ketamine for limb injury pain in children in the emergency department: a pilot study

Fiona Yeaman, Edward Oakley, Robert Meek, Andis Graudins

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41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study aims to conduct a pilot study examining the effectiveness of intranasal (IN) ketamine as an analgesic for children in the ED. METHODS: The present study used an observational study on a convenience sample of paediatric ED patients aged 3-13 years, with moderate to severe (>/=6/10) pain from isolated limb injury. IN ketamine was administered at enrolment, with a supplementary dose after 15 min, if required. Primary outcome was change in median pain rating at 30 min. Secondary outcomes included change in median pain rating at 60 min, patient/parent satisfaction, need for additional analgesia and adverse events being reported. RESULTS: For the 28 children included in the primary analysis, median age was 9 years (interquartile range [IQR] 6-10). Twenty-three (82.1 ) were male. Eighteen (64 ) received only one dose of IN ketamine (mean dose 0.84 mg/kg), whereas 10 (36 ) required a second dose at 15 min (mean for second dose 0.54 mg/kg). The total mean dose for all patients was 1.0 mg/kg (95 CI: 0.92-1.14). The median pain rating decreased from 74.5 mm (IQR 60-85) to 30 mm (IQR 12-51.5) at 30 min (P <0.001, Mann-Whitney). For the 24 children who contributed data at 60 min, the median pain rating was 25 mm (IQR 4-44). Twenty (83 ) subjects were satisfied with their analgesia. Eight (33 ) were given additional opioid analgesia and the 28 reported adverse events were all transient and mild. CONCLUSIONS: In this population, an average dose of 1.0 mg/kg IN ketamine provided adequate analgesia by 30 min for most patients.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)161 - 167
Number of pages7
JournalEmergency Medicine Australasia
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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