Strategies to reduce non-ventilator-associated hospital-acquired pneumonia

A systematic review

Brett G. Mitchell, Philip L. Russo, Allen C. Cheng, Andrew J. Stewardson, Hannah Rosebrock, Stephanie J. Curtis, Sophia Robinson, Martin Kiernan

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Background: Point prevalence studies identify that pneumonia is the most common healthcare associated infection. However, non-ventilator associated healthcare associated pneumonia (NV-HAP) is both underreported and understudied. Most research conducted to date, focuses on ventilator associated pneumonia. We conducted a systematic review, to provide the latest evidence for strategies to reduce NV-HAP and describe the methodological approaches used. Methods: We performed a systematic search to identify research exploring and evaluating NV-HAP preventive measures in hospitals and aged-care facilities. The electronic database Medline was searched, for peer-reviewed articles published between 1st January 1998 and 31st August 2018. An assessment of the study quality and risk of bias of included articles was conducted using the Newcastle–Ottawa Scale. Results: The literature search yielded 1551 articles, with 15 articles meeting the inclusion criteria. The majority of strategies for NV-HAP prevention focussed on oral care (n = 9). Three studies evaluated a form of physical activity, such as passive movements, two studies used dysphagia screening and management; and another study evaluated prophylactic antibiotics. Most studies (n = 12) were conducted in a hospital setting. Six of the fifteen studies were randomised controlled trials. Conclusion: There was considerable heterogeneity in the included studies, including the type of intervention, study design, methods and definitions used to diagnose the NV-HAP. To date, interventions to reduce NV-HAP appear to be based broadly on the themes of improving oral care, increased mobility or movement and dysphagia management.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)229-239
Number of pages11
JournalInfection, Disease and Health
Volume24
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2019

Keywords

  • Healthcare-associated pneumonia
  • Infection control
  • Nursing care
  • Systematic review

Cite this

Mitchell, Brett G. ; Russo, Philip L. ; Cheng, Allen C. ; Stewardson, Andrew J. ; Rosebrock, Hannah ; Curtis, Stephanie J. ; Robinson, Sophia ; Kiernan, Martin. / Strategies to reduce non-ventilator-associated hospital-acquired pneumonia : A systematic review. In: Infection, Disease and Health. 2019 ; Vol. 24, No. 4. pp. 229-239.
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Strategies to reduce non-ventilator-associated hospital-acquired pneumonia : A systematic review. / Mitchell, Brett G.; Russo, Philip L.; Cheng, Allen C.; Stewardson, Andrew J.; Rosebrock, Hannah; Curtis, Stephanie J.; Robinson, Sophia; Kiernan, Martin.

In: Infection, Disease and Health, Vol. 24, No. 4, 11.2019, p. 229-239.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Strategies to reduce non-ventilator-associated hospital-acquired pneumonia

T2 - A systematic review

AU - Mitchell, Brett G.

AU - Russo, Philip L.

AU - Cheng, Allen C.

AU - Stewardson, Andrew J.

AU - Rosebrock, Hannah

AU - Curtis, Stephanie J.

AU - Robinson, Sophia

AU - Kiernan, Martin

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N2 - Background: Point prevalence studies identify that pneumonia is the most common healthcare associated infection. However, non-ventilator associated healthcare associated pneumonia (NV-HAP) is both underreported and understudied. Most research conducted to date, focuses on ventilator associated pneumonia. We conducted a systematic review, to provide the latest evidence for strategies to reduce NV-HAP and describe the methodological approaches used. Methods: We performed a systematic search to identify research exploring and evaluating NV-HAP preventive measures in hospitals and aged-care facilities. The electronic database Medline was searched, for peer-reviewed articles published between 1st January 1998 and 31st August 2018. An assessment of the study quality and risk of bias of included articles was conducted using the Newcastle–Ottawa Scale. Results: The literature search yielded 1551 articles, with 15 articles meeting the inclusion criteria. The majority of strategies for NV-HAP prevention focussed on oral care (n = 9). Three studies evaluated a form of physical activity, such as passive movements, two studies used dysphagia screening and management; and another study evaluated prophylactic antibiotics. Most studies (n = 12) were conducted in a hospital setting. Six of the fifteen studies were randomised controlled trials. Conclusion: There was considerable heterogeneity in the included studies, including the type of intervention, study design, methods and definitions used to diagnose the NV-HAP. To date, interventions to reduce NV-HAP appear to be based broadly on the themes of improving oral care, increased mobility or movement and dysphagia management.

AB - Background: Point prevalence studies identify that pneumonia is the most common healthcare associated infection. However, non-ventilator associated healthcare associated pneumonia (NV-HAP) is both underreported and understudied. Most research conducted to date, focuses on ventilator associated pneumonia. We conducted a systematic review, to provide the latest evidence for strategies to reduce NV-HAP and describe the methodological approaches used. Methods: We performed a systematic search to identify research exploring and evaluating NV-HAP preventive measures in hospitals and aged-care facilities. The electronic database Medline was searched, for peer-reviewed articles published between 1st January 1998 and 31st August 2018. An assessment of the study quality and risk of bias of included articles was conducted using the Newcastle–Ottawa Scale. Results: The literature search yielded 1551 articles, with 15 articles meeting the inclusion criteria. The majority of strategies for NV-HAP prevention focussed on oral care (n = 9). Three studies evaluated a form of physical activity, such as passive movements, two studies used dysphagia screening and management; and another study evaluated prophylactic antibiotics. Most studies (n = 12) were conducted in a hospital setting. Six of the fifteen studies were randomised controlled trials. Conclusion: There was considerable heterogeneity in the included studies, including the type of intervention, study design, methods and definitions used to diagnose the NV-HAP. To date, interventions to reduce NV-HAP appear to be based broadly on the themes of improving oral care, increased mobility or movement and dysphagia management.

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KW - Infection control

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JO - Infection, Disease and Health

JF - Infection, Disease and Health

SN - 2468-0451

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