Sperm wars: The rights and wrongs of reproduction

Heather-Grade Jones, Maggie Kirkman

Research output: Book/ReportBookResearchpeer-review

Abstract

These are pivotal times for reproduction. Making babies is big business, and there are now almost as many ways to create a family as there are different sorts of family to create. At the centre of all this hubbub is sperm. And as with any desirable property, questions about who can get it and on what terms are hotly contested. Add in the current cultural anxieties about changing family structures and the role of fathers, and you have a potent recipe for conflict. Who has the right to use sperm? What makes a father? Is it sperm or changing nappies? Should donors be allowed to decide who can have their gametes? Where do the rights of children fit in? What role should government play in the new reproductive technologies? In this crucial new collection, Heather Grace Jones and Maggie Kirkman have invited contributors from every angle of the sperm debate to have their say on these and many other questions. The breadth of perspectives not only makes for compelling reading; it demonstrates that, as the Sperm Wars range from defensive skirmishes and battles over territory to bloody ideological crusades, we are all potential combatants.
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationSydney, Australia
PublisherABC Books
Number of pages305
ISBN (Print)0 7333 1542 9
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Cite this

Jones, H-G., & Kirkman, M. (2005). Sperm wars: The rights and wrongs of reproduction. Sydney, Australia: ABC Books.
Jones, Heather-Grade ; Kirkman, Maggie. / Sperm wars: The rights and wrongs of reproduction. Sydney, Australia : ABC Books, 2005. 305 p.
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Jones, H-G & Kirkman, M 2005, Sperm wars: The rights and wrongs of reproduction. ABC Books, Sydney, Australia.

Sperm wars: The rights and wrongs of reproduction. / Jones, Heather-Grade; Kirkman, Maggie.

Sydney, Australia : ABC Books, 2005. 305 p.

Research output: Book/ReportBookResearchpeer-review

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Jones H-G, Kirkman M. Sperm wars: The rights and wrongs of reproduction. Sydney, Australia: ABC Books, 2005. 305 p.