Smokers know little of their increased surgical risks and may quit on surgical advice

Ashley Webb, Nicola Robertson, Maryanne Sparrow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleOther

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Smoking cessation before surgery improves perioperative outcomes and some smokers may quit if undergoing surgery. Quitting smoking in community settings is influenced by physician quit advice and knowledge of smoking hazards, but there are few data on whether this applies in perioperative settings. Method: Survey on day of surgery of elective patients who reported being a smoker at the time of wait-list placement. Duration of smoking abstinence before surgery (if any) and length timing of failed quit attempts was determined. Sources of any quit advice before surgery, including from physicians, and patient knowledge on hazards of smoking and surgery were questioned. Results: While on the waiting list, 44/177 smokers reported quitting (>24h) before surgery and 42/177 others made an attempt. Quitting was usually brief. Fewer than 40 of smokers answered yes (correct answer) to questions on whether smoking increased wound infection rates, worsened wound healing, increased anaesthetic complications or increased post-operative pain. Incorrect answers (no) were less likely in quitters than those smoking until surgery (OR 0.41, 95 CI 0.25-0.68). Patients still smoking by admission recalled quit advice from a surgeon in 22.6 of cases, while wait-list quitters recalled surgical quit advice in 43.2 of cases (OR 2.6 95 CI 1.2-5.4 P = 0.01). Effects of general practitioner quit advice were significant (OR 3.2 95 CI 1.5-6.8 P = 0.004) while anaesthetists, nurse and hospital brochure advice were not. Discussion: Improving patient knowledge of the perioperative risks of smoking and increased physician advice to quit may improve smoking abstinence at surgery. ? 2013 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)753 - 757
Number of pages5
JournalANZ Journal of Surgery
Volume83
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Cite this

Webb, Ashley ; Robertson, Nicola ; Sparrow, Maryanne. / Smokers know little of their increased surgical risks and may quit on surgical advice. In: ANZ Journal of Surgery. 2013 ; Vol. 83, No. 10. pp. 753 - 757.
@article{39cae137e1f64b188562dc289141adf1,
title = "Smokers know little of their increased surgical risks and may quit on surgical advice",
abstract = "Background: Smoking cessation before surgery improves perioperative outcomes and some smokers may quit if undergoing surgery. Quitting smoking in community settings is influenced by physician quit advice and knowledge of smoking hazards, but there are few data on whether this applies in perioperative settings. Method: Survey on day of surgery of elective patients who reported being a smoker at the time of wait-list placement. Duration of smoking abstinence before surgery (if any) and length timing of failed quit attempts was determined. Sources of any quit advice before surgery, including from physicians, and patient knowledge on hazards of smoking and surgery were questioned. Results: While on the waiting list, 44/177 smokers reported quitting (>24h) before surgery and 42/177 others made an attempt. Quitting was usually brief. Fewer than 40 of smokers answered yes (correct answer) to questions on whether smoking increased wound infection rates, worsened wound healing, increased anaesthetic complications or increased post-operative pain. Incorrect answers (no) were less likely in quitters than those smoking until surgery (OR 0.41, 95 CI 0.25-0.68). Patients still smoking by admission recalled quit advice from a surgeon in 22.6 of cases, while wait-list quitters recalled surgical quit advice in 43.2 of cases (OR 2.6 95 CI 1.2-5.4 P = 0.01). Effects of general practitioner quit advice were significant (OR 3.2 95 CI 1.5-6.8 P = 0.004) while anaesthetists, nurse and hospital brochure advice were not. Discussion: Improving patient knowledge of the perioperative risks of smoking and increased physician advice to quit may improve smoking abstinence at surgery. ? 2013 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.",
author = "Ashley Webb and Nicola Robertson and Maryanne Sparrow",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.1111/ans.12096",
language = "English",
volume = "83",
pages = "753 -- 757",
journal = "ANZ Journal of Surgery",
issn = "1445-1433",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "10",

}

Smokers know little of their increased surgical risks and may quit on surgical advice. / Webb, Ashley; Robertson, Nicola; Sparrow, Maryanne.

In: ANZ Journal of Surgery, Vol. 83, No. 10, 2013, p. 753 - 757.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleOther

TY - JOUR

T1 - Smokers know little of their increased surgical risks and may quit on surgical advice

AU - Webb, Ashley

AU - Robertson, Nicola

AU - Sparrow, Maryanne

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Background: Smoking cessation before surgery improves perioperative outcomes and some smokers may quit if undergoing surgery. Quitting smoking in community settings is influenced by physician quit advice and knowledge of smoking hazards, but there are few data on whether this applies in perioperative settings. Method: Survey on day of surgery of elective patients who reported being a smoker at the time of wait-list placement. Duration of smoking abstinence before surgery (if any) and length timing of failed quit attempts was determined. Sources of any quit advice before surgery, including from physicians, and patient knowledge on hazards of smoking and surgery were questioned. Results: While on the waiting list, 44/177 smokers reported quitting (>24h) before surgery and 42/177 others made an attempt. Quitting was usually brief. Fewer than 40 of smokers answered yes (correct answer) to questions on whether smoking increased wound infection rates, worsened wound healing, increased anaesthetic complications or increased post-operative pain. Incorrect answers (no) were less likely in quitters than those smoking until surgery (OR 0.41, 95 CI 0.25-0.68). Patients still smoking by admission recalled quit advice from a surgeon in 22.6 of cases, while wait-list quitters recalled surgical quit advice in 43.2 of cases (OR 2.6 95 CI 1.2-5.4 P = 0.01). Effects of general practitioner quit advice were significant (OR 3.2 95 CI 1.5-6.8 P = 0.004) while anaesthetists, nurse and hospital brochure advice were not. Discussion: Improving patient knowledge of the perioperative risks of smoking and increased physician advice to quit may improve smoking abstinence at surgery. ? 2013 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

AB - Background: Smoking cessation before surgery improves perioperative outcomes and some smokers may quit if undergoing surgery. Quitting smoking in community settings is influenced by physician quit advice and knowledge of smoking hazards, but there are few data on whether this applies in perioperative settings. Method: Survey on day of surgery of elective patients who reported being a smoker at the time of wait-list placement. Duration of smoking abstinence before surgery (if any) and length timing of failed quit attempts was determined. Sources of any quit advice before surgery, including from physicians, and patient knowledge on hazards of smoking and surgery were questioned. Results: While on the waiting list, 44/177 smokers reported quitting (>24h) before surgery and 42/177 others made an attempt. Quitting was usually brief. Fewer than 40 of smokers answered yes (correct answer) to questions on whether smoking increased wound infection rates, worsened wound healing, increased anaesthetic complications or increased post-operative pain. Incorrect answers (no) were less likely in quitters than those smoking until surgery (OR 0.41, 95 CI 0.25-0.68). Patients still smoking by admission recalled quit advice from a surgeon in 22.6 of cases, while wait-list quitters recalled surgical quit advice in 43.2 of cases (OR 2.6 95 CI 1.2-5.4 P = 0.01). Effects of general practitioner quit advice were significant (OR 3.2 95 CI 1.5-6.8 P = 0.004) while anaesthetists, nurse and hospital brochure advice were not. Discussion: Improving patient knowledge of the perioperative risks of smoking and increased physician advice to quit may improve smoking abstinence at surgery. ? 2013 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

UR - http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ans.12096/pdf

U2 - 10.1111/ans.12096

DO - 10.1111/ans.12096

M3 - Article

VL - 83

SP - 753

EP - 757

JO - ANZ Journal of Surgery

JF - ANZ Journal of Surgery

SN - 1445-1433

IS - 10

ER -