Sleep apnoea in the child

Gillian M. Nixon, Margot J. Davey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleOtherpeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a condition causing repetitive episodes of upper airway obstruction during sleep, leading to hypoxia and/or sleep disturbance. OSA affects 1-5% of children and has important implications for learning, behaviour and cardiovascular health. Objective: The aim of this article is to provide a suggested approach to case finding and treatment of OSA for general practitioners. Discussion: Snoring or noisy breathing during sleep is the cardinal symptom of OSA, and should be specifically sought in children with disturbed sleep, nasal obstruction and large tonsils. Multichannel physiological recording in a paediatric sleep laboratory is available to formally define the condition. Treatment with adenotonsillectomy usually leads to improvements in key domains. Milder disease may respond to intranasal steroids or anti-inflammatory agents.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)352-355
Number of pages4
JournalAustralian Family Physician
Volume44
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Cite this

Nixon, G. M., & Davey, M. J. (2015). Sleep apnoea in the child. Australian Family Physician, 44(6), 352-355.
Nixon, Gillian M. ; Davey, Margot J. / Sleep apnoea in the child. In: Australian Family Physician. 2015 ; Vol. 44, No. 6. pp. 352-355.
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Nixon, GM & Davey, MJ 2015, 'Sleep apnoea in the child', Australian Family Physician, vol. 44, no. 6, pp. 352-355.

Sleep apnoea in the child. / Nixon, Gillian M.; Davey, Margot J.

In: Australian Family Physician, Vol. 44, No. 6, 2015, p. 352-355.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleOtherpeer-review

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