Single versus double occlusive dressing technique to minimize infusion thrombophlebitis: Vialon® and Teflon® cannulae reassessed

P. S. Myles, M. R. Buckland, W. J. Burnett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Infusion thrombophlebitis is the commonest complication of intravenous cannulation. This study was undertaken to prospectively evaluate a double-occlusive dressing technique and a new cannula, bismuth oxide-Teflon® (Critikon Inc., Aust.), comparing it to Vialon® (Deseret Medical Inc., Utah, USA). The study group of two hundred patients had a 16 gauge intravenous cannula inserted in theatre using a standard technique. The incidence of thrombophlebitis was determined on a daily basis. Cannula tips were sent for culture on removal. Vialon® was found to be superior to Teflon® after day 1. Although a double-occlusive dressing technique increased the duration of cannulation (50.9 vs. 41.9 hours, P < 0.05), there was no difference in the incidence of thrombophlebitis. Neither cannula material nor dressing technique had an influence on the results of cannula tip culture (6% incidence). There was no evidence of bacteraemia in any case.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)525-529
Number of pages5
JournalAnaesthesia and intensive care
Volume19
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 1991

Cite this

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title = "Single versus double occlusive dressing technique to minimize infusion thrombophlebitis: Vialon{\circledR} and Teflon{\circledR} cannulae reassessed",
abstract = "Infusion thrombophlebitis is the commonest complication of intravenous cannulation. This study was undertaken to prospectively evaluate a double-occlusive dressing technique and a new cannula, bismuth oxide-Teflon{\circledR} (Critikon Inc., Aust.), comparing it to Vialon{\circledR} (Deseret Medical Inc., Utah, USA). The study group of two hundred patients had a 16 gauge intravenous cannula inserted in theatre using a standard technique. The incidence of thrombophlebitis was determined on a daily basis. Cannula tips were sent for culture on removal. Vialon{\circledR} was found to be superior to Teflon{\circledR} after day 1. Although a double-occlusive dressing technique increased the duration of cannulation (50.9 vs. 41.9 hours, P < 0.05), there was no difference in the incidence of thrombophlebitis. Neither cannula material nor dressing technique had an influence on the results of cannula tip culture (6{\%} incidence). There was no evidence of bacteraemia in any case.",
author = "Myles, {P. S.} and Buckland, {M. R.} and Burnett, {W. J.}",
year = "1991",
language = "English",
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pages = "525--529",
journal = "Anaesthesia and intensive care",
issn = "0310-057X",
publisher = "Australian Society of Anaesthetists",
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}

Single versus double occlusive dressing technique to minimize infusion thrombophlebitis : Vialon® and Teflon® cannulae reassessed. / Myles, P. S.; Buckland, M. R.; Burnett, W. J.

In: Anaesthesia and intensive care, Vol. 19, No. 4, 1991, p. 525-529.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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T2 - Vialon® and Teflon® cannulae reassessed

AU - Myles, P. S.

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AB - Infusion thrombophlebitis is the commonest complication of intravenous cannulation. This study was undertaken to prospectively evaluate a double-occlusive dressing technique and a new cannula, bismuth oxide-Teflon® (Critikon Inc., Aust.), comparing it to Vialon® (Deseret Medical Inc., Utah, USA). The study group of two hundred patients had a 16 gauge intravenous cannula inserted in theatre using a standard technique. The incidence of thrombophlebitis was determined on a daily basis. Cannula tips were sent for culture on removal. Vialon® was found to be superior to Teflon® after day 1. Although a double-occlusive dressing technique increased the duration of cannulation (50.9 vs. 41.9 hours, P < 0.05), there was no difference in the incidence of thrombophlebitis. Neither cannula material nor dressing technique had an influence on the results of cannula tip culture (6% incidence). There was no evidence of bacteraemia in any case.

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