Simulation-based education for building clinical teams

Stuart D. Marshall, Brendan Flanagan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Failure to work as an effective team is commonly cited as a cause of adverse events and errors in emergency medicine. Until recently, individual knowledge and skills in managing emergencies were taught, without reference to the additional skills required to work as part of a team. Team training courses are now becoming commonplace, however their strategies and modes of delivery are varied. Just as different delivery methods of traditional education can result in different levels of retention and transfer to the real world, the same is true in team training of the material in different ways in traditional forms of education may lead to different levels of retention and transfer to the real world, the same is true in team training. As team training becomes more widespread, the effectiveness of different modes of delivery including the role of simulation-based education needs to be clearly understood. This review examines the basis of team working in emergency medicine, and the components of an effective emergency medical team. Lessons from other domains with more experience in team training are discussed, as well as the variations from these settings that can be observed in medical contexts. Methods and strategies for team training are listed, and experiences in other health care settings as well as emergency medicine are assessed. Finally, best practice guidelines for the development of team training programs in emergency medicine are presented.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)360-368
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock
Volume3
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2010

Keywords

  • Education
  • emergency medicine
  • patient safety
  • simulation
  • team

Cite this

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Simulation-based education for building clinical teams. / Marshall, Stuart D.; Flanagan, Brendan.

In: Journal of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock, Vol. 3, No. 4, 01.10.2010, p. 360-368.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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