Signalling bias in new drug discovery: detection, quantification and therapeutic impact

Terry Kenakin, Arthur Christopoulos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Agonists of seven-transmembrane receptors, also known as G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), do not uniformly activate all cellular signalling pathways linked to a given seven-transmembrane receptor (a phenomenon termed ligand or agonist bias); this discovery has changed how high-throughput screens are designed and how lead compounds are optimized for therapeutic activity. The ability to experimentally detect ligand bias has necessitated the development of methods for quantifying agonist bias in a way that can be used to guide structure-activity studies and the selection of drug candidates. Here, we provide a viewpoint on which methods are appropriate for quantifying bias, based on knowledge of how cellular and intracellular signalling proteins control the conformation of seven-transmembrane receptors. We also discuss possible predictions of how biased molecules may perform in vivo, and what potential therapeutic advantages they may provide.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)205 - 216
Number of pages12
JournalNature Reviews Drug Discovery
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Cite this

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Signalling bias in new drug discovery: detection, quantification and therapeutic impact. / Kenakin, Terry; Christopoulos, Arthur.

In: Nature Reviews Drug Discovery, Vol. 12, No. 3, 2013, p. 205 - 216.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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