Sex with a transgender or gender diverse person among patients attending a sexual health centre in Melbourne, Australia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: All males and females attending the Melbourne Sexual Health Centre (MSHC) from August 2017 were asked whether they had had sex with a transgender or gender diverse (TGD) person using computer-assisted self-interviewing (CASI). We aimed to verify the self-reported responses via chart review. The secondary aim of this study was to identify whether having sex with a TGD person was associated with STI risk. Methods: This was a retrospective chart analysis of patients visiting MSHC between August and December 2017. Chart review was performed to verify the self-reported responses. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to examine the association between having sex with a TGD person and patients' characteristics and STI risk. Results: Of the 10 100 male and female consultations, the proportion who reported having sex with a TGD person was 111 (1.0%) and was higher among males (1.3%) than females (0.6%) (p=0.001). After chart review, we could verify 66.9% of the responses, more for males (75.2%) than females (45.2%) (p<0.001). Of the 6822 males, men aged ≥35 years (adjusted OR=2.2; 95% CI 1.1 to 4.1) were more likely to have sex with a TGD person compared with men aged ≤24 years, after adjusting for confounding factors. Sex with a TGD person was not associated with sexual orientation in males. Of the 3278 females, gay and bisexual females had 13.7-fold (95% CI 5.1 to 37.0) higher odds of having sex with a TGD person than heterosexual females. There was no association between chlamydia positivity and sex with a TGD person in both males and females. Conclusion: When a question on TGD partners is asked as part of routine sexual history using CASI, the majority of responses could be verified. TGD partners were most commonly reported among males. These findings underscore the value of asking patients about sex with TGD partners.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)46-52
Number of pages7
JournalSexually Transmitted Infections
Volume59
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2019

Keywords

  • gender
  • men
  • sexual health
  • transsexual
  • women

Cite this

@article{ae3fc0933f9c44bc95f1010aa24bca80,
title = "Sex with a transgender or gender diverse person among patients attending a sexual health centre in Melbourne, Australia",
abstract = "Objectives: All males and females attending the Melbourne Sexual Health Centre (MSHC) from August 2017 were asked whether they had had sex with a transgender or gender diverse (TGD) person using computer-assisted self-interviewing (CASI). We aimed to verify the self-reported responses via chart review. The secondary aim of this study was to identify whether having sex with a TGD person was associated with STI risk. Methods: This was a retrospective chart analysis of patients visiting MSHC between August and December 2017. Chart review was performed to verify the self-reported responses. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to examine the association between having sex with a TGD person and patients' characteristics and STI risk. Results: Of the 10 100 male and female consultations, the proportion who reported having sex with a TGD person was 111 (1.0{\%}) and was higher among males (1.3{\%}) than females (0.6{\%}) (p=0.001). After chart review, we could verify 66.9{\%} of the responses, more for males (75.2{\%}) than females (45.2{\%}) (p<0.001). Of the 6822 males, men aged ≥35 years (adjusted OR=2.2; 95{\%} CI 1.1 to 4.1) were more likely to have sex with a TGD person compared with men aged ≤24 years, after adjusting for confounding factors. Sex with a TGD person was not associated with sexual orientation in males. Of the 3278 females, gay and bisexual females had 13.7-fold (95{\%} CI 5.1 to 37.0) higher odds of having sex with a TGD person than heterosexual females. There was no association between chlamydia positivity and sex with a TGD person in both males and females. Conclusion: When a question on TGD partners is asked as part of routine sexual history using CASI, the majority of responses could be verified. TGD partners were most commonly reported among males. These findings underscore the value of asking patients about sex with TGD partners.",
keywords = "gender, men, sexual health, transsexual, women",
author = "Cleere, {Eoin F.} and Fairley, {Christopher K.} and Launcelot McGrath and Bradshaw, {Catriona S.} and Chen, {Marcus Y.} and Chow, {Eric P.F.}",
year = "2019",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1136/sextrans-2018-053653",
language = "English",
volume = "59",
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journal = "Sexually Transmitted Infections",
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Sex with a transgender or gender diverse person among patients attending a sexual health centre in Melbourne, Australia. / Cleere, Eoin F.; Fairley, Christopher K.; McGrath, Launcelot; Bradshaw, Catriona S.; Chen, Marcus Y.; Chow, Eric P.F.

In: Sexually Transmitted Infections, Vol. 59, No. 1, 02.2019, p. 46-52.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Sex with a transgender or gender diverse person among patients attending a sexual health centre in Melbourne, Australia

AU - Cleere, Eoin F.

AU - Fairley, Christopher K.

AU - McGrath, Launcelot

AU - Bradshaw, Catriona S.

AU - Chen, Marcus Y.

AU - Chow, Eric P.F.

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N2 - Objectives: All males and females attending the Melbourne Sexual Health Centre (MSHC) from August 2017 were asked whether they had had sex with a transgender or gender diverse (TGD) person using computer-assisted self-interviewing (CASI). We aimed to verify the self-reported responses via chart review. The secondary aim of this study was to identify whether having sex with a TGD person was associated with STI risk. Methods: This was a retrospective chart analysis of patients visiting MSHC between August and December 2017. Chart review was performed to verify the self-reported responses. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to examine the association between having sex with a TGD person and patients' characteristics and STI risk. Results: Of the 10 100 male and female consultations, the proportion who reported having sex with a TGD person was 111 (1.0%) and was higher among males (1.3%) than females (0.6%) (p=0.001). After chart review, we could verify 66.9% of the responses, more for males (75.2%) than females (45.2%) (p<0.001). Of the 6822 males, men aged ≥35 years (adjusted OR=2.2; 95% CI 1.1 to 4.1) were more likely to have sex with a TGD person compared with men aged ≤24 years, after adjusting for confounding factors. Sex with a TGD person was not associated with sexual orientation in males. Of the 3278 females, gay and bisexual females had 13.7-fold (95% CI 5.1 to 37.0) higher odds of having sex with a TGD person than heterosexual females. There was no association between chlamydia positivity and sex with a TGD person in both males and females. Conclusion: When a question on TGD partners is asked as part of routine sexual history using CASI, the majority of responses could be verified. TGD partners were most commonly reported among males. These findings underscore the value of asking patients about sex with TGD partners.

AB - Objectives: All males and females attending the Melbourne Sexual Health Centre (MSHC) from August 2017 were asked whether they had had sex with a transgender or gender diverse (TGD) person using computer-assisted self-interviewing (CASI). We aimed to verify the self-reported responses via chart review. The secondary aim of this study was to identify whether having sex with a TGD person was associated with STI risk. Methods: This was a retrospective chart analysis of patients visiting MSHC between August and December 2017. Chart review was performed to verify the self-reported responses. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to examine the association between having sex with a TGD person and patients' characteristics and STI risk. Results: Of the 10 100 male and female consultations, the proportion who reported having sex with a TGD person was 111 (1.0%) and was higher among males (1.3%) than females (0.6%) (p=0.001). After chart review, we could verify 66.9% of the responses, more for males (75.2%) than females (45.2%) (p<0.001). Of the 6822 males, men aged ≥35 years (adjusted OR=2.2; 95% CI 1.1 to 4.1) were more likely to have sex with a TGD person compared with men aged ≤24 years, after adjusting for confounding factors. Sex with a TGD person was not associated with sexual orientation in males. Of the 3278 females, gay and bisexual females had 13.7-fold (95% CI 5.1 to 37.0) higher odds of having sex with a TGD person than heterosexual females. There was no association between chlamydia positivity and sex with a TGD person in both males and females. Conclusion: When a question on TGD partners is asked as part of routine sexual history using CASI, the majority of responses could be verified. TGD partners were most commonly reported among males. These findings underscore the value of asking patients about sex with TGD partners.

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