Serum lipid and glucose concentrations with a propofol infusion for cardiac surgery

Paul S. Myles, Mark R. Buckland, Denis J. Morgan, Anthony M. Weeks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To document changes in serum lipids and glucose with a propofol infusion technique for cardiac surgery. Design: Prospective cohort. Setting: University teaching hospital. Participants: 22 elective cardiac surgical patients. Interventions: Frequent venous blood sampling. Measurements and Main Results: Serum lipids and glucose were measured at 10 time periods perioperatively, from preinduction until 4 hours post-cardiopulmonary bypass. Plasma propofol concentrations were also measured in 10 of these patients. There was a significant increase in glucose (P < 0.0005) and decreases in cholesterol (P < 0.0005), high-density lipoprotein (P = 0.004), and low-density lipoprotein (P < 0.0005); there was no significant change in triglycerides (P = 0.39). The propofol infusion resulted in acceptable plasma levels throughout the procedure and allowed early extubation in the intensive care unit, after a mean (SD) of 7.14 (5.9) hours. There was a strong correlation between triglyceride and propofol levels at most time periods (r = 0.38 to 0.98). Conclusions: This study demonstrates that a propofol infusion technique does not result in elevation of serum lipids and supports its increased popularity in maintenance of anesthesia for cardiac surgery.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)373-378
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia
Volume9
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1995

Keywords

  • anesthesia
  • cardiac surgery
  • lipids
  • propofol

Cite this

Myles, Paul S. ; Buckland, Mark R. ; Morgan, Denis J. ; Weeks, Anthony M. / Serum lipid and glucose concentrations with a propofol infusion for cardiac surgery. In: Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia. 1995 ; Vol. 9, No. 4. pp. 373-378.
@article{71919bcfa4724e4ba8fc793d755b9e1d,
title = "Serum lipid and glucose concentrations with a propofol infusion for cardiac surgery",
abstract = "Objective: To document changes in serum lipids and glucose with a propofol infusion technique for cardiac surgery. Design: Prospective cohort. Setting: University teaching hospital. Participants: 22 elective cardiac surgical patients. Interventions: Frequent venous blood sampling. Measurements and Main Results: Serum lipids and glucose were measured at 10 time periods perioperatively, from preinduction until 4 hours post-cardiopulmonary bypass. Plasma propofol concentrations were also measured in 10 of these patients. There was a significant increase in glucose (P < 0.0005) and decreases in cholesterol (P < 0.0005), high-density lipoprotein (P = 0.004), and low-density lipoprotein (P < 0.0005); there was no significant change in triglycerides (P = 0.39). The propofol infusion resulted in acceptable plasma levels throughout the procedure and allowed early extubation in the intensive care unit, after a mean (SD) of 7.14 (5.9) hours. There was a strong correlation between triglyceride and propofol levels at most time periods (r = 0.38 to 0.98). Conclusions: This study demonstrates that a propofol infusion technique does not result in elevation of serum lipids and supports its increased popularity in maintenance of anesthesia for cardiac surgery.",
keywords = "anesthesia, cardiac surgery, lipids, propofol",
author = "Myles, {Paul S.} and Buckland, {Mark R.} and Morgan, {Denis J.} and Weeks, {Anthony M.}",
year = "1995",
doi = "10.1016/S1053-0770(05)80090-4",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
pages = "373--378",
journal = "Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia",
issn = "1053-0770",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "4",

}

Serum lipid and glucose concentrations with a propofol infusion for cardiac surgery. / Myles, Paul S.; Buckland, Mark R.; Morgan, Denis J.; Weeks, Anthony M.

In: Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia, Vol. 9, No. 4, 1995, p. 373-378.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Serum lipid and glucose concentrations with a propofol infusion for cardiac surgery

AU - Myles, Paul S.

AU - Buckland, Mark R.

AU - Morgan, Denis J.

AU - Weeks, Anthony M.

PY - 1995

Y1 - 1995

N2 - Objective: To document changes in serum lipids and glucose with a propofol infusion technique for cardiac surgery. Design: Prospective cohort. Setting: University teaching hospital. Participants: 22 elective cardiac surgical patients. Interventions: Frequent venous blood sampling. Measurements and Main Results: Serum lipids and glucose were measured at 10 time periods perioperatively, from preinduction until 4 hours post-cardiopulmonary bypass. Plasma propofol concentrations were also measured in 10 of these patients. There was a significant increase in glucose (P < 0.0005) and decreases in cholesterol (P < 0.0005), high-density lipoprotein (P = 0.004), and low-density lipoprotein (P < 0.0005); there was no significant change in triglycerides (P = 0.39). The propofol infusion resulted in acceptable plasma levels throughout the procedure and allowed early extubation in the intensive care unit, after a mean (SD) of 7.14 (5.9) hours. There was a strong correlation between triglyceride and propofol levels at most time periods (r = 0.38 to 0.98). Conclusions: This study demonstrates that a propofol infusion technique does not result in elevation of serum lipids and supports its increased popularity in maintenance of anesthesia for cardiac surgery.

AB - Objective: To document changes in serum lipids and glucose with a propofol infusion technique for cardiac surgery. Design: Prospective cohort. Setting: University teaching hospital. Participants: 22 elective cardiac surgical patients. Interventions: Frequent venous blood sampling. Measurements and Main Results: Serum lipids and glucose were measured at 10 time periods perioperatively, from preinduction until 4 hours post-cardiopulmonary bypass. Plasma propofol concentrations were also measured in 10 of these patients. There was a significant increase in glucose (P < 0.0005) and decreases in cholesterol (P < 0.0005), high-density lipoprotein (P = 0.004), and low-density lipoprotein (P < 0.0005); there was no significant change in triglycerides (P = 0.39). The propofol infusion resulted in acceptable plasma levels throughout the procedure and allowed early extubation in the intensive care unit, after a mean (SD) of 7.14 (5.9) hours. There was a strong correlation between triglyceride and propofol levels at most time periods (r = 0.38 to 0.98). Conclusions: This study demonstrates that a propofol infusion technique does not result in elevation of serum lipids and supports its increased popularity in maintenance of anesthesia for cardiac surgery.

KW - anesthesia

KW - cardiac surgery

KW - lipids

KW - propofol

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0029133656&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S1053-0770(05)80090-4

DO - 10.1016/S1053-0770(05)80090-4

M3 - Article

VL - 9

SP - 373

EP - 378

JO - Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia

JF - Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia

SN - 1053-0770

IS - 4

ER -