Serum activin A and B, and follistatin in critically ill patients with influenza A(H1N1) infection

Rita Teresa Linko, Mark Peter Hedger, Ville Pettila, Esko T Ruokonen, Helen Ludlow, David Morritz de Kretser

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9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Activin A and its binding protein follistatin (FS) are increased in inflammatory disorders and sepsis. Overexpression of activin A in the lung causes similar histopathological changes as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). ARDS and severe respiratory failure are complications of influenza A(H1N1) infection. Interleukin 6 (IL-6), which in experimental studies increases after activin A release, is known to be related to the severity of H1N1 infection. Our aim was to evaluate the levels of activin A, activin B, FS, IL-6 and IL-10 and their association with the severity of respiratory failure in critically ill H1N1 patients. METHODS: A substudy of a prospective, observational cohort of H1N1 patients in Finnish intensive care units (ICU). Clinical information was recorded during ICU treatment, and serum activin A, activin B, FS, IL-6 and IL-10 were measured at admission to ICU and on days 2 and 7. RESULTS: Blood samples from 29 patients were analysed. At the time of admission to intensive care unit, elevated serum levels above the normal range for respective age group and sex were observed in 44 for activin A, 57 for activin B, and 39 for FS. In 13 of the 29 patients, serial samples at all time points were available and in these the highest activin A, activin B and FS were above the normal range in 85 , 100 and 46 of the patients, respectively. No difference in baseline or highest activin A or activin B was found in patients with or without acute lung injury (ALI) or ARDS (P > 0.05 for all). Peak levels of IL-6 were significantly elevated in ALI/ARDS patients. Peak activin A and activin A/FS were associated with ventilatory support free-days, severity of acute illness and length of ICU stay (P <0.05 for all). CONCLUSIONS: Higher than normal values of these proteins were common in patients with H1N1 infection but we found no association with the severity of their respiratory failure.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1 - 9
Number of pages9
JournalBMC Infectious Diseases
Volume14
Issue number1 (Art. ID: 253)
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Cite this

Linko, Rita Teresa ; Hedger, Mark Peter ; Pettila, Ville ; Ruokonen, Esko T ; Ludlow, Helen ; de Kretser, David Morritz. / Serum activin A and B, and follistatin in critically ill patients with influenza A(H1N1) infection. In: BMC Infectious Diseases. 2014 ; Vol. 14, No. 1 (Art. ID: 253). pp. 1 - 9.
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title = "Serum activin A and B, and follistatin in critically ill patients with influenza A(H1N1) infection",
abstract = "Activin A and its binding protein follistatin (FS) are increased in inflammatory disorders and sepsis. Overexpression of activin A in the lung causes similar histopathological changes as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). ARDS and severe respiratory failure are complications of influenza A(H1N1) infection. Interleukin 6 (IL-6), which in experimental studies increases after activin A release, is known to be related to the severity of H1N1 infection. Our aim was to evaluate the levels of activin A, activin B, FS, IL-6 and IL-10 and their association with the severity of respiratory failure in critically ill H1N1 patients. METHODS: A substudy of a prospective, observational cohort of H1N1 patients in Finnish intensive care units (ICU). Clinical information was recorded during ICU treatment, and serum activin A, activin B, FS, IL-6 and IL-10 were measured at admission to ICU and on days 2 and 7. RESULTS: Blood samples from 29 patients were analysed. At the time of admission to intensive care unit, elevated serum levels above the normal range for respective age group and sex were observed in 44 for activin A, 57 for activin B, and 39 for FS. In 13 of the 29 patients, serial samples at all time points were available and in these the highest activin A, activin B and FS were above the normal range in 85 , 100 and 46 of the patients, respectively. No difference in baseline or highest activin A or activin B was found in patients with or without acute lung injury (ALI) or ARDS (P > 0.05 for all). Peak levels of IL-6 were significantly elevated in ALI/ARDS patients. Peak activin A and activin A/FS were associated with ventilatory support free-days, severity of acute illness and length of ICU stay (P <0.05 for all). CONCLUSIONS: Higher than normal values of these proteins were common in patients with H1N1 infection but we found no association with the severity of their respiratory failure.",
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Serum activin A and B, and follistatin in critically ill patients with influenza A(H1N1) infection. / Linko, Rita Teresa; Hedger, Mark Peter; Pettila, Ville; Ruokonen, Esko T; Ludlow, Helen; de Kretser, David Morritz.

In: BMC Infectious Diseases, Vol. 14, No. 1 (Art. ID: 253), 2014, p. 1 - 9.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Serum activin A and B, and follistatin in critically ill patients with influenza A(H1N1) infection

AU - Linko, Rita Teresa

AU - Hedger, Mark Peter

AU - Pettila, Ville

AU - Ruokonen, Esko T

AU - Ludlow, Helen

AU - de Kretser, David Morritz

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Activin A and its binding protein follistatin (FS) are increased in inflammatory disorders and sepsis. Overexpression of activin A in the lung causes similar histopathological changes as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). ARDS and severe respiratory failure are complications of influenza A(H1N1) infection. Interleukin 6 (IL-6), which in experimental studies increases after activin A release, is known to be related to the severity of H1N1 infection. Our aim was to evaluate the levels of activin A, activin B, FS, IL-6 and IL-10 and their association with the severity of respiratory failure in critically ill H1N1 patients. METHODS: A substudy of a prospective, observational cohort of H1N1 patients in Finnish intensive care units (ICU). Clinical information was recorded during ICU treatment, and serum activin A, activin B, FS, IL-6 and IL-10 were measured at admission to ICU and on days 2 and 7. RESULTS: Blood samples from 29 patients were analysed. At the time of admission to intensive care unit, elevated serum levels above the normal range for respective age group and sex were observed in 44 for activin A, 57 for activin B, and 39 for FS. In 13 of the 29 patients, serial samples at all time points were available and in these the highest activin A, activin B and FS were above the normal range in 85 , 100 and 46 of the patients, respectively. No difference in baseline or highest activin A or activin B was found in patients with or without acute lung injury (ALI) or ARDS (P > 0.05 for all). Peak levels of IL-6 were significantly elevated in ALI/ARDS patients. Peak activin A and activin A/FS were associated with ventilatory support free-days, severity of acute illness and length of ICU stay (P <0.05 for all). CONCLUSIONS: Higher than normal values of these proteins were common in patients with H1N1 infection but we found no association with the severity of their respiratory failure.

AB - Activin A and its binding protein follistatin (FS) are increased in inflammatory disorders and sepsis. Overexpression of activin A in the lung causes similar histopathological changes as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). ARDS and severe respiratory failure are complications of influenza A(H1N1) infection. Interleukin 6 (IL-6), which in experimental studies increases after activin A release, is known to be related to the severity of H1N1 infection. Our aim was to evaluate the levels of activin A, activin B, FS, IL-6 and IL-10 and their association with the severity of respiratory failure in critically ill H1N1 patients. METHODS: A substudy of a prospective, observational cohort of H1N1 patients in Finnish intensive care units (ICU). Clinical information was recorded during ICU treatment, and serum activin A, activin B, FS, IL-6 and IL-10 were measured at admission to ICU and on days 2 and 7. RESULTS: Blood samples from 29 patients were analysed. At the time of admission to intensive care unit, elevated serum levels above the normal range for respective age group and sex were observed in 44 for activin A, 57 for activin B, and 39 for FS. In 13 of the 29 patients, serial samples at all time points were available and in these the highest activin A, activin B and FS were above the normal range in 85 , 100 and 46 of the patients, respectively. No difference in baseline or highest activin A or activin B was found in patients with or without acute lung injury (ALI) or ARDS (P > 0.05 for all). Peak levels of IL-6 were significantly elevated in ALI/ARDS patients. Peak activin A and activin A/FS were associated with ventilatory support free-days, severity of acute illness and length of ICU stay (P <0.05 for all). CONCLUSIONS: Higher than normal values of these proteins were common in patients with H1N1 infection but we found no association with the severity of their respiratory failure.

UR - http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1471-2334-14-253.pdf

U2 - 10.1186/1471-2334-14-253

DO - 10.1186/1471-2334-14-253

M3 - Article

VL - 14

SP - 1

EP - 9

JO - BMC Infectious Diseases

JF - BMC Infectious Diseases

SN - 1471-2334

IS - 1 (Art. ID: 253)

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