Sepsis-Associated Acute Kidney Injury: Macrohemodynamic and Microhemodynamic Alterations in the Renal Circulation

John R. Prowle, Rinaldo Bellomo

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleOtherpeer-review

Abstract

Traditionally, renal ischemia has been regarded as central to the pathogenesis of sepsis-associated acute kidney injury (SA-AKI). Accordingly, hemodynamic management of SA-AKI has emphasized restoration of renal perfusion, whereas, experimentally, ischemia reperfusion models have been emphasized. However, in human beings, SA-AKI usually is accompanied by hyperdynamic circulation. Moreover, clinical and experimental evidence now suggests the importance of inflammatory mechanisms in the development of AKI and microcirculatory dysfunction more than systemic alteration in renal perfusion. In this review, we examine systemic, regional, and microcirculatory hemodynamics in SA-AKI, and attempt to rationalize the hemodynamic management of this condition.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)64-74
Number of pages11
JournalSeminars in Nephrology
Volume35
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2015

Keywords

  • Acute kidney injury
  • Critical care
  • Hemodynamic management
  • Microcirculation
  • Renal blood flow
  • Sepsis

Cite this

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abstract = "Traditionally, renal ischemia has been regarded as central to the pathogenesis of sepsis-associated acute kidney injury (SA-AKI). Accordingly, hemodynamic management of SA-AKI has emphasized restoration of renal perfusion, whereas, experimentally, ischemia reperfusion models have been emphasized. However, in human beings, SA-AKI usually is accompanied by hyperdynamic circulation. Moreover, clinical and experimental evidence now suggests the importance of inflammatory mechanisms in the development of AKI and microcirculatory dysfunction more than systemic alteration in renal perfusion. In this review, we examine systemic, regional, and microcirculatory hemodynamics in SA-AKI, and attempt to rationalize the hemodynamic management of this condition.",
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Sepsis-Associated Acute Kidney Injury : Macrohemodynamic and Microhemodynamic Alterations in the Renal Circulation. / Prowle, John R.; Bellomo, Rinaldo.

In: Seminars in Nephrology, Vol. 35, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 64-74.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleOtherpeer-review

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