Self-reported use of safety gear by riders of powered two wheel vehicles in Victoria, Australia

Babak Amani Jordehi, Geoffrey Rose, Marilyn Johnson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference PaperResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Since motorcycles and motor scooters tend to be overrepresented in road crashes around the world, it is perhaps not surprising that much of the research and government policy attention on PoweredTwoWheel (PTW) vehicles is focussed on road safety issues. In this context, safety gear (protective clothing) which could be worn by PTW riders is considered a key to decrease the severity of crashes. In this regard, understanding the patterns of safety gear use
could be extremely helpful to develop the authors' knowledge in the context of the safety of PTW riders. This paper addresses the need for better knowledge about using different safety gear on the utilitarian and recreational use of different PTWs. The analysis draws on a special survey of PTW usage which was conducted in conjunction with a major household travel survey in Victoria, Australia. Cross tabulations and hypothesis testing provided insight into important differences across subgroups. Also logistic regression models are used to examine the factors which are correlated with whether a particular type of safety gear was worn by a rider or not. The riders’ gender, their riding distance, and purpose of travel including the engine capacity of the PTW are found to be significant explanatory variables. Logistic regression model revealed that male were less likely to wear different safety gears than females while they were found to be a higher proportion of PTW riders. However riders on higher engine capacity PTWs or those who were supposed to ride a greater distance or had a pillion passenger were more likely to wear different safety gears.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationTRB 94th Annual Meeting Compendium of Papers
Place of PublicationWashington DC USA
PublisherUS National Research Council Transportation Research Board
Pages1 - 14
Number of pages14
Publication statusPublished - 2015
EventTransportation Research Board (USA) Annual Meeting 2015 - Washington, United States of America
Duration: 11 Jan 201515 Jan 2015
Conference number: 94

Conference

ConferenceTransportation Research Board (USA) Annual Meeting 2015
Abbreviated titleTRB 2015
CountryUnited States of America
CityWashington
Period11/01/1515/01/15

Cite this

Amani Jordehi, B., Rose, G., & Johnson, M. (2015). Self-reported use of safety gear by riders of powered two wheel vehicles in Victoria, Australia. In TRB 94th Annual Meeting Compendium of Papers (pp. 1 - 14). Washington DC USA: US National Research Council Transportation Research Board.
Amani Jordehi, Babak ; Rose, Geoffrey ; Johnson, Marilyn. / Self-reported use of safety gear by riders of powered two wheel vehicles in Victoria, Australia. TRB 94th Annual Meeting Compendium of Papers. Washington DC USA : US National Research Council Transportation Research Board, 2015. pp. 1 - 14
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Amani Jordehi, B, Rose, G & Johnson, M 2015, Self-reported use of safety gear by riders of powered two wheel vehicles in Victoria, Australia. in TRB 94th Annual Meeting Compendium of Papers. US National Research Council Transportation Research Board, Washington DC USA, pp. 1 - 14, Transportation Research Board (USA) Annual Meeting 2015, Washington, United States of America, 11/01/15.

Self-reported use of safety gear by riders of powered two wheel vehicles in Victoria, Australia. / Amani Jordehi, Babak; Rose, Geoffrey; Johnson, Marilyn.

TRB 94th Annual Meeting Compendium of Papers. Washington DC USA : US National Research Council Transportation Research Board, 2015. p. 1 - 14.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference PaperResearchpeer-review

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N2 - Since motorcycles and motor scooters tend to be overrepresented in road crashes around the world, it is perhaps not surprising that much of the research and government policy attention on PoweredTwoWheel (PTW) vehicles is focussed on road safety issues. In this context, safety gear (protective clothing) which could be worn by PTW riders is considered a key to decrease the severity of crashes. In this regard, understanding the patterns of safety gear usecould be extremely helpful to develop the authors' knowledge in the context of the safety of PTW riders. This paper addresses the need for better knowledge about using different safety gear on the utilitarian and recreational use of different PTWs. The analysis draws on a special survey of PTW usage which was conducted in conjunction with a major household travel survey in Victoria, Australia. Cross tabulations and hypothesis testing provided insight into important differences across subgroups. Also logistic regression models are used to examine the factors which are correlated with whether a particular type of safety gear was worn by a rider or not. The riders’ gender, their riding distance, and purpose of travel including the engine capacity of the PTW are found to be significant explanatory variables. Logistic regression model revealed that male were less likely to wear different safety gears than females while they were found to be a higher proportion of PTW riders. However riders on higher engine capacity PTWs or those who were supposed to ride a greater distance or had a pillion passenger were more likely to wear different safety gears.

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Amani Jordehi B, Rose G, Johnson M. Self-reported use of safety gear by riders of powered two wheel vehicles in Victoria, Australia. In TRB 94th Annual Meeting Compendium of Papers. Washington DC USA: US National Research Council Transportation Research Board. 2015. p. 1 - 14