Self-reported impulsivity and inhibitory control in problem gamblers

Felicity Kate Lorains, Julie C Stout, John Lockyer Bradshaw, Nicki Andrea Dowling, Peter Gregory Enticott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Impulsivity is considered a core feature of problem gambling; however, self-reported impulsivity and inhibitory control may reflect disparate constructs. We examined self-reported impulsivity and inhibitory control in 39 treatment-seeking problem gamblers and 41 matched controls using a range of self-report questionnaires and laboratory inhibitory control tasks. We also investigated differences between treatment-seeking problem gamblers who prefer strategic (e.g., sports betting) and nonstrategic (e.g., electronic gaming machines) gambling activities. Treatment-seeking problem gamblers demonstrated elevated self-reported impulsivity, more go errors on the Stop Signal Task, and a lower gap score on the Random Number Generation task than matched controls. However, overall we did not find strong evidence that treatment-seeking problem gamblers are more impulsive on laboratory inhibitory control measures. Furthermore, strategic and nonstrategic problem gamblers did not differ from their respective controls on either self-reported impulsivity questionnaires or laboratory inhibitory control measures. Contrary to expectations, our results suggest that inhibitory dyscontrol may not be a key component for some treatment-seeking problem gamblers.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)144 - 157
Number of pages14
JournalNeuropsychology, Development and Cognition. Section A: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology
Volume36
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Cite this

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title = "Self-reported impulsivity and inhibitory control in problem gamblers",
abstract = "Impulsivity is considered a core feature of problem gambling; however, self-reported impulsivity and inhibitory control may reflect disparate constructs. We examined self-reported impulsivity and inhibitory control in 39 treatment-seeking problem gamblers and 41 matched controls using a range of self-report questionnaires and laboratory inhibitory control tasks. We also investigated differences between treatment-seeking problem gamblers who prefer strategic (e.g., sports betting) and nonstrategic (e.g., electronic gaming machines) gambling activities. Treatment-seeking problem gamblers demonstrated elevated self-reported impulsivity, more go errors on the Stop Signal Task, and a lower gap score on the Random Number Generation task than matched controls. However, overall we did not find strong evidence that treatment-seeking problem gamblers are more impulsive on laboratory inhibitory control measures. Furthermore, strategic and nonstrategic problem gamblers did not differ from their respective controls on either self-reported impulsivity questionnaires or laboratory inhibitory control measures. Contrary to expectations, our results suggest that inhibitory dyscontrol may not be a key component for some treatment-seeking problem gamblers.",
author = "Lorains, {Felicity Kate} and Stout, {Julie C} and Bradshaw, {John Lockyer} and Dowling, {Nicki Andrea} and Enticott, {Peter Gregory}",
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Self-reported impulsivity and inhibitory control in problem gamblers. / Lorains, Felicity Kate; Stout, Julie C; Bradshaw, John Lockyer; Dowling, Nicki Andrea; Enticott, Peter Gregory.

In: Neuropsychology, Development and Cognition. Section A: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, Vol. 36, No. 2, 2014, p. 144 - 157.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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