Self-predicted and actual performance in an introductory programming course

Paul Denny, Andrew Luxton-Reilly, John Hamer, Dana B. Dahlstrom, Helen C. Purchase

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference PaperResearchpeer-review

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Students in a large introductory programming course were asked twice to predict their scores on the final exam: once at the beginning of a six-week module, and once at the end. In between, students in only one of the two lecture streams recorded subjective confidence in their answers to individual questions on weekly quizzes. Students' predictions were moderately correlated with their scores. Students who attended more quizzes had not only higher exam scores, but improved their predictions more than those who attended fewer quizzes. Practice recording confidence on individual quiz questions did not yield significantly more improvement in exam predictions. Several findings from previous work are confirmed, including that women were significantly more underconfident than men.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationITiCSE'10 - Proceedings of the 2010 ACM SIGCSE Annual Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery (ACM)
Pages118-122
Number of pages5
ISBN (Print)9781605588209
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes
EventAnnual Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education 2010 - Ankara, Türkiye
Duration: 26 Jun 201030 Jun 2010
Conference number: 15th
https://dl.acm.org/doi/proceedings/10.1145/1822090 (Proceedings)

Conference

ConferenceAnnual Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education 2010
Abbreviated titleITiCSE 2010
Country/TerritoryTürkiye
CityAnkara
Period26/06/1030/06/10
OtherProceedings of the 2010 ACM SIGCSE Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education
Internet address

Keywords

  • Confidence
  • Gender
  • Learning
  • Metacognition

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