Self-generated chemotactic gradients - cells steering themselves

Luke Tweedy, Olivia Susanto, Robert H. Insall

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleOtherpeer-review

Abstract

Chemotaxis is a fundamentally important part of biology, but we know very little about how gradients of chemoattractant are formed. One answer is self-generated gradients, in which the moving cells break down the attractant to provide their own gradient as they migrate. Here we discuss where self-generated gradients are known, how they can be recognized, and where they are likely to be found in the future.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)46-51
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent Opinion in Cell Biology
Volume42
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2016
Externally publishedYes

Cite this

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Self-generated chemotactic gradients - cells steering themselves. / Tweedy, Luke; Susanto, Olivia; Insall, Robert H.

In: Current Opinion in Cell Biology, Vol. 42, 01.10.2016, p. 46-51.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleOtherpeer-review

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