School-Age Outcomes of Early Intervention for Preterm Infants and Their Parents: A Randomized Trial

Alicia J. Spittle, Sarah Barton, Karli Treyvaud, Carly S. Molloy, Lex W. Doyle, Peter J. Anderson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To examine the child and parental outcomes at school age of a randomized controlled trial of a home-based early preventative care program for infants born very preterm and their caregivers.

METHODS: At term-equivalent age, 120 infants born at a gestational age of <30 weeks were randomly allocated to intervention (n = 61) or standard care (n = 59) groups. The intervention included 9 home visits over the first year of life focusing on infant development, parental mental health, and the parent-infant relationship. At 8 years' corrected age, children's cognitive, behavioral, and motor functioning and parental mental health were assessed. Analysis was by intention to treat.

RESULTS: One hundred children, including 13 sets of twins, attended follow-up (85% follow-up of survivors). Children in the intervention group were less likely to have mathematics difficulties (odds ratio, 0.42; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.18 to 0.98; P = .045) than children in the standard care group, but there was no evidence of an effect on other developmental outcomes. Parents in the intervention group reported fewer symptoms of depression (mean difference, -2.7; 95% CI, -4.0 to -1.4; P < .001) and had reduced odds for mild to severe depression (odds ratio, 0.14; 95% CI, 0.03 to 0.68; P = .0152) than parents in the standard care group.

CONCLUSIONS: An early preventive care program for very preterm infants and their parents had minimal long-term effects on child neurodevelopmental outcomes at the 8-year follow-up, whereas primary caregivers in the intervention group reported less depression.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages9
JournalPediatrics
Volume138
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2016
Externally publishedYes

Cite this

Spittle, Alicia J. ; Barton, Sarah ; Treyvaud, Karli ; Molloy, Carly S. ; Doyle, Lex W. ; Anderson, Peter J. / School-Age Outcomes of Early Intervention for Preterm Infants and Their Parents : A Randomized Trial. In: Pediatrics. 2016 ; Vol. 138, No. 6.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To examine the child and parental outcomes at school age of a randomized controlled trial of a home-based early preventative care program for infants born very preterm and their caregivers.METHODS: At term-equivalent age, 120 infants born at a gestational age of <30 weeks were randomly allocated to intervention (n = 61) or standard care (n = 59) groups. The intervention included 9 home visits over the first year of life focusing on infant development, parental mental health, and the parent-infant relationship. At 8 years' corrected age, children's cognitive, behavioral, and motor functioning and parental mental health were assessed. Analysis was by intention to treat.RESULTS: One hundred children, including 13 sets of twins, attended follow-up (85{\%} follow-up of survivors). Children in the intervention group were less likely to have mathematics difficulties (odds ratio, 0.42; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 0.18 to 0.98; P = .045) than children in the standard care group, but there was no evidence of an effect on other developmental outcomes. Parents in the intervention group reported fewer symptoms of depression (mean difference, -2.7; 95{\%} CI, -4.0 to -1.4; P < .001) and had reduced odds for mild to severe depression (odds ratio, 0.14; 95{\%} CI, 0.03 to 0.68; P = .0152) than parents in the standard care group.CONCLUSIONS: An early preventive care program for very preterm infants and their parents had minimal long-term effects on child neurodevelopmental outcomes at the 8-year follow-up, whereas primary caregivers in the intervention group reported less depression.",
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School-Age Outcomes of Early Intervention for Preterm Infants and Their Parents : A Randomized Trial. / Spittle, Alicia J.; Barton, Sarah; Treyvaud, Karli; Molloy, Carly S.; Doyle, Lex W.; Anderson, Peter J.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 138, No. 6, 01.12.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - School-Age Outcomes of Early Intervention for Preterm Infants and Their Parents

T2 - A Randomized Trial

AU - Spittle, Alicia J.

AU - Barton, Sarah

AU - Treyvaud, Karli

AU - Molloy, Carly S.

AU - Doyle, Lex W.

AU - Anderson, Peter J.

PY - 2016/12/1

Y1 - 2016/12/1

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine the child and parental outcomes at school age of a randomized controlled trial of a home-based early preventative care program for infants born very preterm and their caregivers.METHODS: At term-equivalent age, 120 infants born at a gestational age of <30 weeks were randomly allocated to intervention (n = 61) or standard care (n = 59) groups. The intervention included 9 home visits over the first year of life focusing on infant development, parental mental health, and the parent-infant relationship. At 8 years' corrected age, children's cognitive, behavioral, and motor functioning and parental mental health were assessed. Analysis was by intention to treat.RESULTS: One hundred children, including 13 sets of twins, attended follow-up (85% follow-up of survivors). Children in the intervention group were less likely to have mathematics difficulties (odds ratio, 0.42; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.18 to 0.98; P = .045) than children in the standard care group, but there was no evidence of an effect on other developmental outcomes. Parents in the intervention group reported fewer symptoms of depression (mean difference, -2.7; 95% CI, -4.0 to -1.4; P < .001) and had reduced odds for mild to severe depression (odds ratio, 0.14; 95% CI, 0.03 to 0.68; P = .0152) than parents in the standard care group.CONCLUSIONS: An early preventive care program for very preterm infants and their parents had minimal long-term effects on child neurodevelopmental outcomes at the 8-year follow-up, whereas primary caregivers in the intervention group reported less depression.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To examine the child and parental outcomes at school age of a randomized controlled trial of a home-based early preventative care program for infants born very preterm and their caregivers.METHODS: At term-equivalent age, 120 infants born at a gestational age of <30 weeks were randomly allocated to intervention (n = 61) or standard care (n = 59) groups. The intervention included 9 home visits over the first year of life focusing on infant development, parental mental health, and the parent-infant relationship. At 8 years' corrected age, children's cognitive, behavioral, and motor functioning and parental mental health were assessed. Analysis was by intention to treat.RESULTS: One hundred children, including 13 sets of twins, attended follow-up (85% follow-up of survivors). Children in the intervention group were less likely to have mathematics difficulties (odds ratio, 0.42; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.18 to 0.98; P = .045) than children in the standard care group, but there was no evidence of an effect on other developmental outcomes. Parents in the intervention group reported fewer symptoms of depression (mean difference, -2.7; 95% CI, -4.0 to -1.4; P < .001) and had reduced odds for mild to severe depression (odds ratio, 0.14; 95% CI, 0.03 to 0.68; P = .0152) than parents in the standard care group.CONCLUSIONS: An early preventive care program for very preterm infants and their parents had minimal long-term effects on child neurodevelopmental outcomes at the 8-year follow-up, whereas primary caregivers in the intervention group reported less depression.

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DO - 10.1542/peds.2016-1363

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VL - 138

JO - Pediatrics

JF - Pediatrics

SN - 0031-4005

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