Rowley review. Sex determination in birds

A review

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearchpeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In birds, sex determination occurs at fertilisation by the inheritance of sex chromosomes. This review summarises our current understanding of sex determination in birds, with emphasis on the molecular genetics of male versus female development during embryonic life. Recent studies in the Chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) have revealed some remarkable features of avian sex determination, such as the finding that sex appears to be determined autonomously within cells throughout the body, and the demonstration that the key, sex-linked gene, DMRT1, is required for testis formation and hence male development. However, despite these recent advances, the mechanism of avian sex determination is still not entirely clear. Understanding sex determination in birds has important implications for the conservation of threatened species, and for the global poultry industry.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)364-377
Number of pages14
JournalEmu: Austral Ornithology
Volume110
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes

Cite this

@article{298654cd8f5b4774a7a7662eeeb19ae5,
title = "Rowley review. Sex determination in birds: A review",
abstract = "In birds, sex determination occurs at fertilisation by the inheritance of sex chromosomes. This review summarises our current understanding of sex determination in birds, with emphasis on the molecular genetics of male versus female development during embryonic life. Recent studies in the Chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) have revealed some remarkable features of avian sex determination, such as the finding that sex appears to be determined autonomously within cells throughout the body, and the demonstration that the key, sex-linked gene, DMRT1, is required for testis formation and hence male development. However, despite these recent advances, the mechanism of avian sex determination is still not entirely clear. Understanding sex determination in birds has important implications for the conservation of threatened species, and for the global poultry industry.",
author = "Smith, {Craig A.}",
year = "2010",
doi = "10.1071/MU10030",
language = "English",
volume = "110",
pages = "364--377",
journal = "Emu: Austral Ornithology",
issn = "0158-4197",
publisher = "CSIRO Publishing",
number = "4",

}

Rowley review. Sex determination in birds : A review. / Smith, Craig A.

In: Emu: Austral Ornithology, Vol. 110, No. 4, 2010, p. 364-377.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Rowley review. Sex determination in birds

T2 - A review

AU - Smith, Craig A.

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - In birds, sex determination occurs at fertilisation by the inheritance of sex chromosomes. This review summarises our current understanding of sex determination in birds, with emphasis on the molecular genetics of male versus female development during embryonic life. Recent studies in the Chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) have revealed some remarkable features of avian sex determination, such as the finding that sex appears to be determined autonomously within cells throughout the body, and the demonstration that the key, sex-linked gene, DMRT1, is required for testis formation and hence male development. However, despite these recent advances, the mechanism of avian sex determination is still not entirely clear. Understanding sex determination in birds has important implications for the conservation of threatened species, and for the global poultry industry.

AB - In birds, sex determination occurs at fertilisation by the inheritance of sex chromosomes. This review summarises our current understanding of sex determination in birds, with emphasis on the molecular genetics of male versus female development during embryonic life. Recent studies in the Chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) have revealed some remarkable features of avian sex determination, such as the finding that sex appears to be determined autonomously within cells throughout the body, and the demonstration that the key, sex-linked gene, DMRT1, is required for testis formation and hence male development. However, despite these recent advances, the mechanism of avian sex determination is still not entirely clear. Understanding sex determination in birds has important implications for the conservation of threatened species, and for the global poultry industry.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=78649566731&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1071/MU10030

DO - 10.1071/MU10030

M3 - Review Article

VL - 110

SP - 364

EP - 377

JO - Emu: Austral Ornithology

JF - Emu: Austral Ornithology

SN - 0158-4197

IS - 4

ER -