Role of inflammation and the angiotensin type 2 receptor in the regulation of arterial pressure during pregnancy in mice

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Abstract

During normal pregnancy the renin-angiotensin system is activated, yet pregnant women are resistant to the pressor effects of angiotensin II. Our aim was to determine the role of the angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT2R) in the regulation of arterial pressure, natriuresis, and immune cell infiltration during pregnancy. Mean arterial pressure was measured via telemetry, and flow cytometry was used to enumerate immune cell infiltration in 14-week-old wild-type and AT2R knockout mice during gestation. In wild-type mice, mean arterial pressure decreased during gestation, reaching a nadir at gestational day 9 (-6+/-2 mm Hg) and returned to near preconception levels during late gestation. In AT2R-deficient mice, the midgestational decrease in mean arterial pressure was absent. Furthermore, mean arterial pressure was significantly increased during late gestation compared with wild-type mice ( approximately 10 mm Hg). As expected, circulating immune cell activation was suppressed during pregnancy. However, this response was absent in AT2R-deficient mice. While renal immune cell infiltration was similar between the genotypes, there was a significant T cell phenotypic switch toward a proinflammatory T-helper 1 phenotype in AT2R-deficient mice. These data indicate that the AT2R plays an important role in arterial pressure regulation and may modulate T cell activation and renal cytokine production during pregnancy. Therefore, deficits in AT2R expression may contribute to pregnancy-induced hypertension and thus represents a potential therapeutic target.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)626 - 631
Number of pages6
JournalHypertension
Volume64
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Cite this

@article{21cb49e190414e6b8dda0070f82bb242,
title = "Role of inflammation and the angiotensin type 2 receptor in the regulation of arterial pressure during pregnancy in mice",
abstract = "During normal pregnancy the renin-angiotensin system is activated, yet pregnant women are resistant to the pressor effects of angiotensin II. Our aim was to determine the role of the angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT2R) in the regulation of arterial pressure, natriuresis, and immune cell infiltration during pregnancy. Mean arterial pressure was measured via telemetry, and flow cytometry was used to enumerate immune cell infiltration in 14-week-old wild-type and AT2R knockout mice during gestation. In wild-type mice, mean arterial pressure decreased during gestation, reaching a nadir at gestational day 9 (-6+/-2 mm Hg) and returned to near preconception levels during late gestation. In AT2R-deficient mice, the midgestational decrease in mean arterial pressure was absent. Furthermore, mean arterial pressure was significantly increased during late gestation compared with wild-type mice ( approximately 10 mm Hg). As expected, circulating immune cell activation was suppressed during pregnancy. However, this response was absent in AT2R-deficient mice. While renal immune cell infiltration was similar between the genotypes, there was a significant T cell phenotypic switch toward a proinflammatory T-helper 1 phenotype in AT2R-deficient mice. These data indicate that the AT2R plays an important role in arterial pressure regulation and may modulate T cell activation and renal cytokine production during pregnancy. Therefore, deficits in AT2R expression may contribute to pregnancy-induced hypertension and thus represents a potential therapeutic target.",
author = "Mirabito, {Katrina M.} and Hilliard, {Lucinda M.} and Zihui Wei and Chris Tikellis and Widdop, {Robert E} and Antony Vinh and Denton, {Katherine M}",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.114.03189",
language = "English",
volume = "64",
pages = "626 -- 631",
journal = "Hypertension",
issn = "0194-911X",
publisher = "American Heart Association",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Role of inflammation and the angiotensin type 2 receptor in the regulation of arterial pressure during pregnancy in mice

AU - Mirabito, Katrina M.

AU - Hilliard, Lucinda M.

AU - Wei, Zihui

AU - Tikellis, Chris

AU - Widdop, Robert E

AU - Vinh, Antony

AU - Denton, Katherine M

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - During normal pregnancy the renin-angiotensin system is activated, yet pregnant women are resistant to the pressor effects of angiotensin II. Our aim was to determine the role of the angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT2R) in the regulation of arterial pressure, natriuresis, and immune cell infiltration during pregnancy. Mean arterial pressure was measured via telemetry, and flow cytometry was used to enumerate immune cell infiltration in 14-week-old wild-type and AT2R knockout mice during gestation. In wild-type mice, mean arterial pressure decreased during gestation, reaching a nadir at gestational day 9 (-6+/-2 mm Hg) and returned to near preconception levels during late gestation. In AT2R-deficient mice, the midgestational decrease in mean arterial pressure was absent. Furthermore, mean arterial pressure was significantly increased during late gestation compared with wild-type mice ( approximately 10 mm Hg). As expected, circulating immune cell activation was suppressed during pregnancy. However, this response was absent in AT2R-deficient mice. While renal immune cell infiltration was similar between the genotypes, there was a significant T cell phenotypic switch toward a proinflammatory T-helper 1 phenotype in AT2R-deficient mice. These data indicate that the AT2R plays an important role in arterial pressure regulation and may modulate T cell activation and renal cytokine production during pregnancy. Therefore, deficits in AT2R expression may contribute to pregnancy-induced hypertension and thus represents a potential therapeutic target.

AB - During normal pregnancy the renin-angiotensin system is activated, yet pregnant women are resistant to the pressor effects of angiotensin II. Our aim was to determine the role of the angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT2R) in the regulation of arterial pressure, natriuresis, and immune cell infiltration during pregnancy. Mean arterial pressure was measured via telemetry, and flow cytometry was used to enumerate immune cell infiltration in 14-week-old wild-type and AT2R knockout mice during gestation. In wild-type mice, mean arterial pressure decreased during gestation, reaching a nadir at gestational day 9 (-6+/-2 mm Hg) and returned to near preconception levels during late gestation. In AT2R-deficient mice, the midgestational decrease in mean arterial pressure was absent. Furthermore, mean arterial pressure was significantly increased during late gestation compared with wild-type mice ( approximately 10 mm Hg). As expected, circulating immune cell activation was suppressed during pregnancy. However, this response was absent in AT2R-deficient mice. While renal immune cell infiltration was similar between the genotypes, there was a significant T cell phenotypic switch toward a proinflammatory T-helper 1 phenotype in AT2R-deficient mice. These data indicate that the AT2R plays an important role in arterial pressure regulation and may modulate T cell activation and renal cytokine production during pregnancy. Therefore, deficits in AT2R expression may contribute to pregnancy-induced hypertension and thus represents a potential therapeutic target.

UR - http://hyper.ahajournals.org/content/64/3/626.full.pdf

U2 - 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.114.03189

DO - 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.114.03189

M3 - Article

VL - 64

SP - 626

EP - 631

JO - Hypertension

JF - Hypertension

SN - 0194-911X

IS - 3

ER -