Reticular pseudodrusen in intermediate age-related macular degeneration

Prevalence, detection, clinical, environmental, and genetic associations

Zhichao Wu, Lauren N Ayton, Chi D Luu, Paul N Baird, Robyn H. Guymer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE. To determine the prevalence of reticular pseudodrusen (RPD) and their detection using multimodal imaging in patients with bilateral large drusen, and examine their clinical, demographic, environmental, and genetic associations. METHODS. Three hundred participants with bilateral large drusen (>125 µm) underwent color fundus photography (CFP), near-infrared reflectance (NIR), fundus autofluorescence (FAF), and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) imaging. Demographic information, smoking, and medical history were recorded, and a blood sample was obtained and genotyped to identify the risk alleles of the CFH and ARMS2 genes. RESULTS. Reticular pseudodrusen were detected in 28.2% eyes of 29.0% participants using NIR and SD-OCT combined, but CFP and FAF detected only 42% and 89%, respectively, of these eyes with RPD. Participants with RPD were significantly older than those without (P < 0.001), but there was no significant difference in sex distribution, smoking history, cardiovascular factors, and minor allele frequency of the CFH gene (P > 0.173). However, the minor allele frequency of the ARMS2 gene was significantly higher in participants with RPD (P = 0.002). The presence of RPD was also independently associated with the presence of atrophic changes (including nascent geographic atrophy and drusen-associated atrophy detected on SD-OCT; P = 0.043). CONCLUSIONS. Reticular pseudodrusen were detected on NIR and SD-OCT in more than a quarter of participants with bilateral large drusen, being often overlooked with CFP. Those with RPD had a higher frequency of the ARMS2 risk variant, and eyes with RPD were more likely to have atrophic changes. These findings are important to consider when managing patients with intermediate AMD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1310-1316
Number of pages7
JournalInvestigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science
Volume57
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Age-related macular degeneration
  • Drusen
  • Reticular pseudodrusen
  • Subretinal drusenoid deposits

Cite this

@article{92c824b0c367402b986b0f2f2f58a3ca,
title = "Reticular pseudodrusen in intermediate age-related macular degeneration: Prevalence, detection, clinical, environmental, and genetic associations",
abstract = "PURPOSE. To determine the prevalence of reticular pseudodrusen (RPD) and their detection using multimodal imaging in patients with bilateral large drusen, and examine their clinical, demographic, environmental, and genetic associations. METHODS. Three hundred participants with bilateral large drusen (>125 µm) underwent color fundus photography (CFP), near-infrared reflectance (NIR), fundus autofluorescence (FAF), and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) imaging. Demographic information, smoking, and medical history were recorded, and a blood sample was obtained and genotyped to identify the risk alleles of the CFH and ARMS2 genes. RESULTS. Reticular pseudodrusen were detected in 28.2{\%} eyes of 29.0{\%} participants using NIR and SD-OCT combined, but CFP and FAF detected only 42{\%} and 89{\%}, respectively, of these eyes with RPD. Participants with RPD were significantly older than those without (P < 0.001), but there was no significant difference in sex distribution, smoking history, cardiovascular factors, and minor allele frequency of the CFH gene (P > 0.173). However, the minor allele frequency of the ARMS2 gene was significantly higher in participants with RPD (P = 0.002). The presence of RPD was also independently associated with the presence of atrophic changes (including nascent geographic atrophy and drusen-associated atrophy detected on SD-OCT; P = 0.043). CONCLUSIONS. Reticular pseudodrusen were detected on NIR and SD-OCT in more than a quarter of participants with bilateral large drusen, being often overlooked with CFP. Those with RPD had a higher frequency of the ARMS2 risk variant, and eyes with RPD were more likely to have atrophic changes. These findings are important to consider when managing patients with intermediate AMD.",
keywords = "Age-related macular degeneration, Drusen, Reticular pseudodrusen, Subretinal drusenoid deposits",
author = "Zhichao Wu and Ayton, {Lauren N} and Luu, {Chi D} and Baird, {Paul N} and Guymer, {Robyn H.}",
year = "2016",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1167/iovs.15-18682",
language = "English",
volume = "57",
pages = "1310--1316",
journal = "Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science",
issn = "1552-5783",
publisher = "Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology",
number = "3",

}

Reticular pseudodrusen in intermediate age-related macular degeneration : Prevalence, detection, clinical, environmental, and genetic associations. / Wu, Zhichao; Ayton, Lauren N; Luu, Chi D; Baird, Paul N; Guymer, Robyn H.

In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Vol. 57, No. 3, 01.03.2016, p. 1310-1316.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Reticular pseudodrusen in intermediate age-related macular degeneration

T2 - Prevalence, detection, clinical, environmental, and genetic associations

AU - Wu, Zhichao

AU - Ayton, Lauren N

AU - Luu, Chi D

AU - Baird, Paul N

AU - Guymer, Robyn H.

PY - 2016/3/1

Y1 - 2016/3/1

N2 - PURPOSE. To determine the prevalence of reticular pseudodrusen (RPD) and their detection using multimodal imaging in patients with bilateral large drusen, and examine their clinical, demographic, environmental, and genetic associations. METHODS. Three hundred participants with bilateral large drusen (>125 µm) underwent color fundus photography (CFP), near-infrared reflectance (NIR), fundus autofluorescence (FAF), and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) imaging. Demographic information, smoking, and medical history were recorded, and a blood sample was obtained and genotyped to identify the risk alleles of the CFH and ARMS2 genes. RESULTS. Reticular pseudodrusen were detected in 28.2% eyes of 29.0% participants using NIR and SD-OCT combined, but CFP and FAF detected only 42% and 89%, respectively, of these eyes with RPD. Participants with RPD were significantly older than those without (P < 0.001), but there was no significant difference in sex distribution, smoking history, cardiovascular factors, and minor allele frequency of the CFH gene (P > 0.173). However, the minor allele frequency of the ARMS2 gene was significantly higher in participants with RPD (P = 0.002). The presence of RPD was also independently associated with the presence of atrophic changes (including nascent geographic atrophy and drusen-associated atrophy detected on SD-OCT; P = 0.043). CONCLUSIONS. Reticular pseudodrusen were detected on NIR and SD-OCT in more than a quarter of participants with bilateral large drusen, being often overlooked with CFP. Those with RPD had a higher frequency of the ARMS2 risk variant, and eyes with RPD were more likely to have atrophic changes. These findings are important to consider when managing patients with intermediate AMD.

AB - PURPOSE. To determine the prevalence of reticular pseudodrusen (RPD) and their detection using multimodal imaging in patients with bilateral large drusen, and examine their clinical, demographic, environmental, and genetic associations. METHODS. Three hundred participants with bilateral large drusen (>125 µm) underwent color fundus photography (CFP), near-infrared reflectance (NIR), fundus autofluorescence (FAF), and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) imaging. Demographic information, smoking, and medical history were recorded, and a blood sample was obtained and genotyped to identify the risk alleles of the CFH and ARMS2 genes. RESULTS. Reticular pseudodrusen were detected in 28.2% eyes of 29.0% participants using NIR and SD-OCT combined, but CFP and FAF detected only 42% and 89%, respectively, of these eyes with RPD. Participants with RPD were significantly older than those without (P < 0.001), but there was no significant difference in sex distribution, smoking history, cardiovascular factors, and minor allele frequency of the CFH gene (P > 0.173). However, the minor allele frequency of the ARMS2 gene was significantly higher in participants with RPD (P = 0.002). The presence of RPD was also independently associated with the presence of atrophic changes (including nascent geographic atrophy and drusen-associated atrophy detected on SD-OCT; P = 0.043). CONCLUSIONS. Reticular pseudodrusen were detected on NIR and SD-OCT in more than a quarter of participants with bilateral large drusen, being often overlooked with CFP. Those with RPD had a higher frequency of the ARMS2 risk variant, and eyes with RPD were more likely to have atrophic changes. These findings are important to consider when managing patients with intermediate AMD.

KW - Age-related macular degeneration

KW - Drusen

KW - Reticular pseudodrusen

KW - Subretinal drusenoid deposits

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84961577236&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1167/iovs.15-18682

DO - 10.1167/iovs.15-18682

M3 - Article

VL - 57

SP - 1310

EP - 1316

JO - Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science

JF - Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science

SN - 1552-5783

IS - 3

ER -