Resolving the theory of planned behaviour's 'expectancy-value muddle' using dimensional salience

Joshua Newton, Michael Thomas Ewing, Susan Burney, Margaret Hay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The theory of planned behaviour is one of the most widely used models of decision-making in the health literature. Unfortunately, the primary method for assessing the theory s belief-based expectancy-value models results in statistically uninterpretable findings, giving rise to what has become known as the expectancy-value muddle . Moreover, existing methods for resolving this muddle are associated with various conceptual or practical limitations. This study addresses these issues by identifying and evaluating a parsimonious method for resolving the expectancy-value muddle. Three hundred and nine Australian residents aged 18-24 years rated the expectancy and value of 18 beliefs about posthumous organ donation. Participants also nominated their five most salient beliefs using a dimensional salience approach. Salient beliefs were perceived as being more likely to eventuate than non-salient beliefs, indicating that salient beliefs could be used to signify the expectancy component. The expectancy-value term was therefore represented by summing the value ratings of salient beliefs, an approach that predicted attitude (adjusted R (2)a??=a??0.21) and intention (adjusted R (2)a??=a??0.21). These findings suggest that the dimensional salience approach is a useful method for overcoming the expectancy-value muddle in applied research settings
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)588 - 602
Number of pages15
JournalPsychology & Health
Volume27
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Cite this

Newton, Joshua ; Ewing, Michael Thomas ; Burney, Susan ; Hay, Margaret. / Resolving the theory of planned behaviour's 'expectancy-value muddle' using dimensional salience. In: Psychology & Health. 2012 ; Vol. 27, No. 5. pp. 588 - 602.
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Resolving the theory of planned behaviour's 'expectancy-value muddle' using dimensional salience. / Newton, Joshua; Ewing, Michael Thomas; Burney, Susan; Hay, Margaret.

In: Psychology & Health, Vol. 27, No. 5, 2012, p. 588 - 602.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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