Repeat self-harm and mental health service use after self-harm in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse communities: insights from a data linkage study in Victoria, Australia

Thi Thu Le Pham, Kerry S. O’Brien, Sara Liu, Katharine Gibson, Janneke Berecki-Gisolf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: To examine the associations between Culturally and Linguistically Diverse backgrounds (vs non-Culturally and Linguistically Diverse) and in-hospital death due to self-harm, repeat self-harm and mental health service use after self-harm. Method: A retrospective study of 42,127 self-harm hospital inpatients aged 15+ years in Victoria, Australia, from July 2008 to June 2019. Linked hospital and mental health service data were used to assess in-hospital death, repeat self-harm and mental health service use in the 12 months following index self-harm hospital admission. Logistic regression and zero-inflated negative binomial regression models were used to estimate associations between cultural background and outcomes. Results: Culturally and Linguistically Diverse people accounted for 13.3% of self-harm hospital inpatients. In-hospital death (0.8% of all patients) was negatively associated with Culturally and Linguistically Diverse background. Within 12 months, 12.9% of patients had self-harm readmission and 20.1% presented to emergency department with self-harm. Logistic regression components of zero-inflated negative binomial regression models showed no differences in the odds of (hospital-treated) self-harm reoccurrence between Culturally and Linguistically Diverse and non- Culturally and Linguistically Diverse self-harm inpatients. However, count components of models show that among those with repeat self-harm, Culturally and Linguistically Diverse people (e.g. born in Southern and Central Asia) made fewer additional hospital revisits than non-Culturally and Linguistically Diverse people. Clinical mental health service contacts following self-harm were made in 63.6% of patients, with Culturally and Linguistically Diverse people (Asian backgrounds 43.7%) less likely to make contact than the non-Culturally and Linguistically Diverse group (65.1%). Conclusions: Culturally and Linguistically Diverse and non-Culturally and Linguistically Diverse people did not differ in the likelihood of hospital-treated repeat self-harm, but among those with self-harm repetition Culturally and Linguistically Diverse people had fewer recurrences than non-Culturally and Linguistically Diverse people and utilised mental health services less following self-harm admissions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1547-1561
Number of pages15
JournalAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
Volume57
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2023

Keywords

  • CALD
  • country of birth
  • cultural backgrounds
  • mental health
  • outcomes
  • region of birth
  • Self-harm

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