Regional cooling caused recent New Zealand glacier advances in a period of global warming

Andrew N. Mackintosh, Brian M. Anderson, Andrew M. Lorrey, James A. Renwick, Prisco Frei, Sam M. Dean

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Glaciers experienced worldwide retreat during the twentieth and early twenty first centuries, and the negative trend in global glacier mass balance since the early 1990s is predominantly a response to anthropogenic climate warming. The exceptional terminus advance of some glaciers during recent global warming is thought to relate to locally specific climate conditions, such as increased precipitation. In New Zealand, at least 58 glaciers advanced between 1983 and 2008, and Franz Josef and Fox glaciers advanced nearly continuously during this time. Here we show that the glacier advance phase resulted predominantly from discrete periods of reduced air temperature, rather than increased precipitation. The lower temperatures were associated with anomalous southerly winds and low sea surface temperature in the Tasman Sea region. These conditions result from variability in the structure of the extratropical atmospheric circulation over the South Pacific. While this sequence of climate variability and its effect on New Zealand glaciers is unusual on a global scale, it remains consistent with a climate system that is being modified by humans.

Original languageEnglish
Article number14202
Number of pages13
JournalNature Communications
Volume8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Feb 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • glacier
  • mass balance
  • moraine

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