Recovery Oriented Services in Rural Victoria: the SNAP experience

Research output: Contribution to conferenceOtherOtherpeer-review

Abstract

1. Describe the context
SNAP Gippsland Inc is a small rural not for profit, Community Managed Mental Health Service that delivers recovery oriented, evidence based services to adults with an enduring mental illness in Gippsland.
2. What is the problem or service challenge?
The service challenge was to move this small rural service from a service with a ‘doing for’ approach (institutional/disabling/people were fearful of leaving the service because they ‘might lose their spot’) with no dedicated models of service and care to a ‘doing with’ and a coaching approach (recovery focused/enabling/ educative/promotion of self-management/move in and out of service as required) that contributes to research and benchmarking of good service
3. What is the innovation?
• Adopting research validated evidenced based models of service and care such as the ‘Collaborative Recovery Model’, ‘Flourish’ and the ‘Optimal Health Program’,
• Developing a Framework of Service that allows participants to move in and out of service as required for a specific purpose/goal
• Participating in and developing an organizational research culture
4. How does it contribute to service quality?
The programs and services that SNAP offers respond to the individuals need, choice, hopes and aspirations. Services and programs are educative, recovery focused and aimed at citizenship and self–management. It also employs Peer Facilitators (people with a lived experience of mental illness) who deliver programs and conduct exit interviews when people leave SNAP’s services
5. How does it contribute to service performance?
SNAP’s dedicated models of service are responsive to the individuals circumstances and are based on their values and the things that are most dear to the participant, they are goal oriented and outcome focused.
6. What arrangements have been made for sustainability?
The entire organisation has embraced a ‘values based’ approach which is imbedded in the Collaborative Recovery Model; from the Boards Strategic Planning to staff appraisals, to individual service delivery. It is the way we do business. SNAP has a coaching culture, our staff coach our clients and our staff coaches coach the staff. SNAP has its own trainers in each of the models of service and is not reliant on external input apart from the maintenance of the trainers’ accreditation.
7. Are there any arrangements for evaluation or evaluative research?
SNAP has a strong research culture, all programs delivered are evaluated and it continues to participate in research, particularly with the University of Wollongong, Illawarra Institute for Mental Health with whom it has participated in an Australian Research Council (ARC) Linkages Grant completed in 2012 and is currently working on a new ARC Linkages Grant for the coming round of submissions in November, 2012.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2012
EventAustralian Rural and Remote Mental Health Symposium - Hotel Grand Chancellor on Hindley, Adealide SA, Australia
Duration: 19 Nov 201221 Nov 2012
Conference number: 4th

Conference

ConferenceAustralian Rural and Remote Mental Health Symposium
CountryAustralia
CityAdealide SA
Period19/11/1221/11/12

Cite this

Isaacs, A. N. (2012). Recovery Oriented Services in Rural Victoria: the SNAP experience. Australian Rural and Remote Mental Health Symposium , Adealide SA, Australia.
Isaacs, Anton Neville. / Recovery Oriented Services in Rural Victoria: the SNAP experience. Australian Rural and Remote Mental Health Symposium , Adealide SA, Australia.
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title = "Recovery Oriented Services in Rural Victoria: the SNAP experience",
abstract = "1. Describe the contextSNAP Gippsland Inc is a small rural not for profit, Community Managed Mental Health Service that delivers recovery oriented, evidence based services to adults with an enduring mental illness in Gippsland.2. What is the problem or service challenge?The service challenge was to move this small rural service from a service with a ‘doing for’ approach (institutional/disabling/people were fearful of leaving the service because they ‘might lose their spot’) with no dedicated models of service and care to a ‘doing with’ and a coaching approach (recovery focused/enabling/ educative/promotion of self-management/move in and out of service as required) that contributes to research and benchmarking of good service3. What is the innovation?• Adopting research validated evidenced based models of service and care such as the ‘Collaborative Recovery Model’, ‘Flourish’ and the ‘Optimal Health Program’,• Developing a Framework of Service that allows participants to move in and out of service as required for a specific purpose/goal • Participating in and developing an organizational research culture4. How does it contribute to service quality?The programs and services that SNAP offers respond to the individuals need, choice, hopes and aspirations. Services and programs are educative, recovery focused and aimed at citizenship and self–management. It also employs Peer Facilitators (people with a lived experience of mental illness) who deliver programs and conduct exit interviews when people leave SNAP’s services5. How does it contribute to service performance?SNAP’s dedicated models of service are responsive to the individuals circumstances and are based on their values and the things that are most dear to the participant, they are goal oriented and outcome focused.6. What arrangements have been made for sustainability?The entire organisation has embraced a ‘values based’ approach which is imbedded in the Collaborative Recovery Model; from the Boards Strategic Planning to staff appraisals, to individual service delivery. It is the way we do business. SNAP has a coaching culture, our staff coach our clients and our staff coaches coach the staff. SNAP has its own trainers in each of the models of service and is not reliant on external input apart from the maintenance of the trainers’ accreditation.7. Are there any arrangements for evaluation or evaluative research?SNAP has a strong research culture, all programs delivered are evaluated and it continues to participate in research, particularly with the University of Wollongong, Illawarra Institute for Mental Health with whom it has participated in an Australian Research Council (ARC) Linkages Grant completed in 2012 and is currently working on a new ARC Linkages Grant for the coming round of submissions in November, 2012.",
author = "Isaacs, {Anton Neville}",
year = "2012",
language = "English",
note = "Australian Rural and Remote Mental Health Symposium ; Conference date: 19-11-2012 Through 21-11-2012",

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Isaacs, AN 2012, 'Recovery Oriented Services in Rural Victoria: the SNAP experience' Australian Rural and Remote Mental Health Symposium , Adealide SA, Australia, 19/11/12 - 21/11/12, .

Recovery Oriented Services in Rural Victoria: the SNAP experience. / Isaacs, Anton Neville.

2012. Australian Rural and Remote Mental Health Symposium , Adealide SA, Australia.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceOtherOtherpeer-review

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T1 - Recovery Oriented Services in Rural Victoria: the SNAP experience

AU - Isaacs, Anton Neville

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - 1. Describe the contextSNAP Gippsland Inc is a small rural not for profit, Community Managed Mental Health Service that delivers recovery oriented, evidence based services to adults with an enduring mental illness in Gippsland.2. What is the problem or service challenge?The service challenge was to move this small rural service from a service with a ‘doing for’ approach (institutional/disabling/people were fearful of leaving the service because they ‘might lose their spot’) with no dedicated models of service and care to a ‘doing with’ and a coaching approach (recovery focused/enabling/ educative/promotion of self-management/move in and out of service as required) that contributes to research and benchmarking of good service3. What is the innovation?• Adopting research validated evidenced based models of service and care such as the ‘Collaborative Recovery Model’, ‘Flourish’ and the ‘Optimal Health Program’,• Developing a Framework of Service that allows participants to move in and out of service as required for a specific purpose/goal • Participating in and developing an organizational research culture4. How does it contribute to service quality?The programs and services that SNAP offers respond to the individuals need, choice, hopes and aspirations. Services and programs are educative, recovery focused and aimed at citizenship and self–management. It also employs Peer Facilitators (people with a lived experience of mental illness) who deliver programs and conduct exit interviews when people leave SNAP’s services5. How does it contribute to service performance?SNAP’s dedicated models of service are responsive to the individuals circumstances and are based on their values and the things that are most dear to the participant, they are goal oriented and outcome focused.6. What arrangements have been made for sustainability?The entire organisation has embraced a ‘values based’ approach which is imbedded in the Collaborative Recovery Model; from the Boards Strategic Planning to staff appraisals, to individual service delivery. It is the way we do business. SNAP has a coaching culture, our staff coach our clients and our staff coaches coach the staff. SNAP has its own trainers in each of the models of service and is not reliant on external input apart from the maintenance of the trainers’ accreditation.7. Are there any arrangements for evaluation or evaluative research?SNAP has a strong research culture, all programs delivered are evaluated and it continues to participate in research, particularly with the University of Wollongong, Illawarra Institute for Mental Health with whom it has participated in an Australian Research Council (ARC) Linkages Grant completed in 2012 and is currently working on a new ARC Linkages Grant for the coming round of submissions in November, 2012.

AB - 1. Describe the contextSNAP Gippsland Inc is a small rural not for profit, Community Managed Mental Health Service that delivers recovery oriented, evidence based services to adults with an enduring mental illness in Gippsland.2. What is the problem or service challenge?The service challenge was to move this small rural service from a service with a ‘doing for’ approach (institutional/disabling/people were fearful of leaving the service because they ‘might lose their spot’) with no dedicated models of service and care to a ‘doing with’ and a coaching approach (recovery focused/enabling/ educative/promotion of self-management/move in and out of service as required) that contributes to research and benchmarking of good service3. What is the innovation?• Adopting research validated evidenced based models of service and care such as the ‘Collaborative Recovery Model’, ‘Flourish’ and the ‘Optimal Health Program’,• Developing a Framework of Service that allows participants to move in and out of service as required for a specific purpose/goal • Participating in and developing an organizational research culture4. How does it contribute to service quality?The programs and services that SNAP offers respond to the individuals need, choice, hopes and aspirations. Services and programs are educative, recovery focused and aimed at citizenship and self–management. It also employs Peer Facilitators (people with a lived experience of mental illness) who deliver programs and conduct exit interviews when people leave SNAP’s services5. How does it contribute to service performance?SNAP’s dedicated models of service are responsive to the individuals circumstances and are based on their values and the things that are most dear to the participant, they are goal oriented and outcome focused.6. What arrangements have been made for sustainability?The entire organisation has embraced a ‘values based’ approach which is imbedded in the Collaborative Recovery Model; from the Boards Strategic Planning to staff appraisals, to individual service delivery. It is the way we do business. SNAP has a coaching culture, our staff coach our clients and our staff coaches coach the staff. SNAP has its own trainers in each of the models of service and is not reliant on external input apart from the maintenance of the trainers’ accreditation.7. Are there any arrangements for evaluation or evaluative research?SNAP has a strong research culture, all programs delivered are evaluated and it continues to participate in research, particularly with the University of Wollongong, Illawarra Institute for Mental Health with whom it has participated in an Australian Research Council (ARC) Linkages Grant completed in 2012 and is currently working on a new ARC Linkages Grant for the coming round of submissions in November, 2012.

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Isaacs AN. Recovery Oriented Services in Rural Victoria: the SNAP experience. 2012. Australian Rural and Remote Mental Health Symposium , Adealide SA, Australia.