Reciprocal innovation in modding communities as a means of increasing cultural diversity and historical accuracy in video games

Andrew V. Moshirnia, Anthony C. Walker

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Due to the growing power and versatility of home hardware and software, the participatory design and modification, or modding, of commercial video games has become increasingly common. This paper examines and defines emergent features, the tendency of modders to inject aspects of themselves in the game, to advertise their outside interests, and to increase the historical value of the game by dramatically altering previously unimportant game features. The production process for emergent features tends to generate multiple, equally viable user-modifications which often serve mutually exclusive purposes. The paper concludes with the educational implications of reciprocal innovation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages362-368
Number of pages7
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2007
Event3rd Digital Games Research Association International Conference: "Situated Play", DiGRA 2007 - Tokyo, Japan
Duration: 24 Sep 200728 Sep 2007

Conference

Conference3rd Digital Games Research Association International Conference: "Situated Play", DiGRA 2007
CountryJapan
CityTokyo
Period24/09/0728/09/07

Keywords

  • Collaborative design
  • Emergent features
  • New roles of the instructor & learner
  • Reciprocal innovation

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