Rare DNA variants in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene increase risk for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: a next-generation sequencing study

Ziarih Hawi, Tarrant DR Cummins, Janette Tong, Mauricio Arcos-Burgos, Qiongyi Zhao, Natasha Matthews, Daniel P Newman, Beth Johnson, Alasdair Vance, Helen S Heussler, Florence Levy, Simon Easteal, Naomi Wray, Elaine Kenny, Derek Morris, Lindsay Kent, Michael Gill, Mark A Bellgrove

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a prevalent and highly heritable disorder of childhood with negative lifetime outcomes. Although candidate gene and genome-wide association studies have identified promising common variant signals, these explain only a fraction of the heritability of ADHD. The observation that rare structural variants confer substantial risk to psychiatric disorders suggests that rare variants might explain a portion of the missing heritability for ADHD. Here we believe we performed the first large-scale next-generation targeted sequencing study of ADHD in 152 child and adolescent cases and 188 controls across an a priori set of 117 genes. A multi-marker gene-level analysis of rare (
LanguageEnglish
Pages580-584
Number of pages5
JournalMolecular Psychiatry
Volume22
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2017

Cite this

Hawi, Ziarih ; Cummins, Tarrant DR ; Tong, Janette ; Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio ; Zhao, Qiongyi ; Matthews, Natasha ; Newman, Daniel P ; Johnson, Beth ; Vance, Alasdair ; Heussler, Helen S ; Levy, Florence ; Easteal, Simon ; Wray, Naomi ; Kenny, Elaine ; Morris, Derek ; Kent, Lindsay ; Gill, Michael ; Bellgrove, Mark A. / Rare DNA variants in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene increase risk for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder : a next-generation sequencing study. In: Molecular Psychiatry. 2017 ; Vol. 22. pp. 580-584
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title = "Rare DNA variants in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene increase risk for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: a next-generation sequencing study",
abstract = "Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a prevalent and highly heritable disorder of childhood with negative lifetime outcomes. Although candidate gene and genome-wide association studies have identified promising common variant signals, these explain only a fraction of the heritability of ADHD. The observation that rare structural variants confer substantial risk to psychiatric disorders suggests that rare variants might explain a portion of the missing heritability for ADHD. Here we believe we performed the first large-scale next-generation targeted sequencing study of ADHD in 152 child and adolescent cases and 188 controls across an a priori set of 117 genes. A multi-marker gene-level analysis of rare (",
author = "Ziarih Hawi and Cummins, {Tarrant DR} and Janette Tong and Mauricio Arcos-Burgos and Qiongyi Zhao and Natasha Matthews and Newman, {Daniel P} and Beth Johnson and Alasdair Vance and Heussler, {Helen S} and Florence Levy and Simon Easteal and Naomi Wray and Elaine Kenny and Derek Morris and Lindsay Kent and Michael Gill and Bellgrove, {Mark A}",
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Hawi, Z, Cummins, TDR, Tong, J, Arcos-Burgos, M, Zhao, Q, Matthews, N, Newman, DP, Johnson, B, Vance, A, Heussler, HS, Levy, F, Easteal, S, Wray, N, Kenny, E, Morris, D, Kent, L, Gill, M & Bellgrove, MA 2017, 'Rare DNA variants in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene increase risk for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: a next-generation sequencing study' Molecular Psychiatry, vol. 22, pp. 580-584. DOI: 10.1038/mp.2016.117

Rare DNA variants in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene increase risk for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder : a next-generation sequencing study. / Hawi, Ziarih; Cummins, Tarrant DR; Tong, Janette; Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio; Zhao, Qiongyi; Matthews, Natasha; Newman, Daniel P; Johnson, Beth; Vance, Alasdair; Heussler, Helen S; Levy, Florence; Easteal, Simon; Wray, Naomi; Kenny, Elaine; Morris, Derek; Kent, Lindsay; Gill, Michael; Bellgrove, Mark A.

In: Molecular Psychiatry, Vol. 22, 04.2017, p. 580-584.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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