Randomised, controlled, cross-over trial of soy protein with isoflavones on blood pressure and arterial function in hypertensive subjects

Helena Jane Teede, Dimitra Giannopoulos, F Dalais, J M Hodgson, Barry Patrick McGrath

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Abstract

Objective: To examine the effects of dietary soy/isoflavones on 24 hr blood pressure profiles and arterial function [systemic arterial compliance (SAC), pulse wave velocity (PWV) and brachial arterial flow mediated vasodilation (FMD)] compared to non legume-based plant protein without isoflavones, in hypertensive subjects. Design: In a 6 month double-blind, placebo controlled, cross-over trial, 41 hypertensive subjects (26 men, 15 postmenopausal women), 30-75 years, received soy cereal (40 g soy protein, 118 mg isoflavones) and gluten placebo cereal, each for 3 months. Results: Thirty-eight subjects completed protocol with results expressed as mean or mean change (+/- SEM) with each intervention. Soy increased urinary isoflavones (daidzein: 8-fold; genistein: 8-fold; equol: 9-fold; ODMA: 18-fold) with no change during gluten placebo. There was no difference in the change in individual 24 hr ambulatory BP parameters (SBP: 2 +/- 2 vs -1 +/- 1 mmHg, p = 0.21; DBP: 1 +/- 1 vs -1 +/- 1 mmHg, p = 0.06) central BP (cSBP: -4 +/- 2 vs 0 2 mmHg, p = 0.2) or the change in arterial function (FMD: 0.3 +/- 0.5 vs -0.2 +/- 0.5 ; p = NS; SAC: 0.02 +/- 0.02 vs -0.02 +/- 0.02 U/mmHg, p = NS; PWV central: -0.2 +/- 0.2 vs 0.0 +/- 0.2 m/sec, p = NS; PWV peripheral: 0.01 +/- 0.3 vs -0.4 +/- 0.4 m/sec, p = NS) noted between interventions. Analysis of the area under curve of 24 hr BP outputs demonstrated that soy protein compared to gluten protein resulted in higher 24 hr systolic BP by 2.3 mmHg (p = 0.003), a higher daytime systolic BP by 3.4 mmHg (p = 0.0002) and a higher daytime diastolic BP by 1.4 mmHg (p = 0.008). Overall 24 hr diastolic BP, night systolic BP and night diastolic BP were not significantly different between groups. Furthermore, soy protein compared to gluten protein resulted in higher 24 hr heart rates by 3.5 bpm (p <0.0001). Conclusions: In hypertensive subjects, compared to gluten placebo, soy dietary supplementation containing isoflavones had no effect on arteria
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)533 - 540
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American College of Nutrition
Volume25
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - 2006

Cite this

@article{25b8e88e6189443092b554be783bac84,
title = "Randomised, controlled, cross-over trial of soy protein with isoflavones on blood pressure and arterial function in hypertensive subjects",
abstract = "Objective: To examine the effects of dietary soy/isoflavones on 24 hr blood pressure profiles and arterial function [systemic arterial compliance (SAC), pulse wave velocity (PWV) and brachial arterial flow mediated vasodilation (FMD)] compared to non legume-based plant protein without isoflavones, in hypertensive subjects. Design: In a 6 month double-blind, placebo controlled, cross-over trial, 41 hypertensive subjects (26 men, 15 postmenopausal women), 30-75 years, received soy cereal (40 g soy protein, 118 mg isoflavones) and gluten placebo cereal, each for 3 months. Results: Thirty-eight subjects completed protocol with results expressed as mean or mean change (+/- SEM) with each intervention. Soy increased urinary isoflavones (daidzein: 8-fold; genistein: 8-fold; equol: 9-fold; ODMA: 18-fold) with no change during gluten placebo. There was no difference in the change in individual 24 hr ambulatory BP parameters (SBP: 2 +/- 2 vs -1 +/- 1 mmHg, p = 0.21; DBP: 1 +/- 1 vs -1 +/- 1 mmHg, p = 0.06) central BP (cSBP: -4 +/- 2 vs 0 2 mmHg, p = 0.2) or the change in arterial function (FMD: 0.3 +/- 0.5 vs -0.2 +/- 0.5 ; p = NS; SAC: 0.02 +/- 0.02 vs -0.02 +/- 0.02 U/mmHg, p = NS; PWV central: -0.2 +/- 0.2 vs 0.0 +/- 0.2 m/sec, p = NS; PWV peripheral: 0.01 +/- 0.3 vs -0.4 +/- 0.4 m/sec, p = NS) noted between interventions. Analysis of the area under curve of 24 hr BP outputs demonstrated that soy protein compared to gluten protein resulted in higher 24 hr systolic BP by 2.3 mmHg (p = 0.003), a higher daytime systolic BP by 3.4 mmHg (p = 0.0002) and a higher daytime diastolic BP by 1.4 mmHg (p = 0.008). Overall 24 hr diastolic BP, night systolic BP and night diastolic BP were not significantly different between groups. Furthermore, soy protein compared to gluten protein resulted in higher 24 hr heart rates by 3.5 bpm (p <0.0001). Conclusions: In hypertensive subjects, compared to gluten placebo, soy dietary supplementation containing isoflavones had no effect on arteria",
author = "Teede, {Helena Jane} and Dimitra Giannopoulos and F Dalais and Hodgson, {J M} and McGrath, {Barry Patrick}",
year = "2006",
language = "English",
volume = "25",
pages = "533 -- 540",
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Randomised, controlled, cross-over trial of soy protein with isoflavones on blood pressure and arterial function in hypertensive subjects. / Teede, Helena Jane; Giannopoulos, Dimitra; Dalais, F; Hodgson, J M; McGrath, Barry Patrick.

In: Journal of the American College of Nutrition, Vol. 25, No. 6, 2006, p. 533 - 540.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Randomised, controlled, cross-over trial of soy protein with isoflavones on blood pressure and arterial function in hypertensive subjects

AU - Teede, Helena Jane

AU - Giannopoulos, Dimitra

AU - Dalais, F

AU - Hodgson, J M

AU - McGrath, Barry Patrick

PY - 2006

Y1 - 2006

N2 - Objective: To examine the effects of dietary soy/isoflavones on 24 hr blood pressure profiles and arterial function [systemic arterial compliance (SAC), pulse wave velocity (PWV) and brachial arterial flow mediated vasodilation (FMD)] compared to non legume-based plant protein without isoflavones, in hypertensive subjects. Design: In a 6 month double-blind, placebo controlled, cross-over trial, 41 hypertensive subjects (26 men, 15 postmenopausal women), 30-75 years, received soy cereal (40 g soy protein, 118 mg isoflavones) and gluten placebo cereal, each for 3 months. Results: Thirty-eight subjects completed protocol with results expressed as mean or mean change (+/- SEM) with each intervention. Soy increased urinary isoflavones (daidzein: 8-fold; genistein: 8-fold; equol: 9-fold; ODMA: 18-fold) with no change during gluten placebo. There was no difference in the change in individual 24 hr ambulatory BP parameters (SBP: 2 +/- 2 vs -1 +/- 1 mmHg, p = 0.21; DBP: 1 +/- 1 vs -1 +/- 1 mmHg, p = 0.06) central BP (cSBP: -4 +/- 2 vs 0 2 mmHg, p = 0.2) or the change in arterial function (FMD: 0.3 +/- 0.5 vs -0.2 +/- 0.5 ; p = NS; SAC: 0.02 +/- 0.02 vs -0.02 +/- 0.02 U/mmHg, p = NS; PWV central: -0.2 +/- 0.2 vs 0.0 +/- 0.2 m/sec, p = NS; PWV peripheral: 0.01 +/- 0.3 vs -0.4 +/- 0.4 m/sec, p = NS) noted between interventions. Analysis of the area under curve of 24 hr BP outputs demonstrated that soy protein compared to gluten protein resulted in higher 24 hr systolic BP by 2.3 mmHg (p = 0.003), a higher daytime systolic BP by 3.4 mmHg (p = 0.0002) and a higher daytime diastolic BP by 1.4 mmHg (p = 0.008). Overall 24 hr diastolic BP, night systolic BP and night diastolic BP were not significantly different between groups. Furthermore, soy protein compared to gluten protein resulted in higher 24 hr heart rates by 3.5 bpm (p <0.0001). Conclusions: In hypertensive subjects, compared to gluten placebo, soy dietary supplementation containing isoflavones had no effect on arteria

AB - Objective: To examine the effects of dietary soy/isoflavones on 24 hr blood pressure profiles and arterial function [systemic arterial compliance (SAC), pulse wave velocity (PWV) and brachial arterial flow mediated vasodilation (FMD)] compared to non legume-based plant protein without isoflavones, in hypertensive subjects. Design: In a 6 month double-blind, placebo controlled, cross-over trial, 41 hypertensive subjects (26 men, 15 postmenopausal women), 30-75 years, received soy cereal (40 g soy protein, 118 mg isoflavones) and gluten placebo cereal, each for 3 months. Results: Thirty-eight subjects completed protocol with results expressed as mean or mean change (+/- SEM) with each intervention. Soy increased urinary isoflavones (daidzein: 8-fold; genistein: 8-fold; equol: 9-fold; ODMA: 18-fold) with no change during gluten placebo. There was no difference in the change in individual 24 hr ambulatory BP parameters (SBP: 2 +/- 2 vs -1 +/- 1 mmHg, p = 0.21; DBP: 1 +/- 1 vs -1 +/- 1 mmHg, p = 0.06) central BP (cSBP: -4 +/- 2 vs 0 2 mmHg, p = 0.2) or the change in arterial function (FMD: 0.3 +/- 0.5 vs -0.2 +/- 0.5 ; p = NS; SAC: 0.02 +/- 0.02 vs -0.02 +/- 0.02 U/mmHg, p = NS; PWV central: -0.2 +/- 0.2 vs 0.0 +/- 0.2 m/sec, p = NS; PWV peripheral: 0.01 +/- 0.3 vs -0.4 +/- 0.4 m/sec, p = NS) noted between interventions. Analysis of the area under curve of 24 hr BP outputs demonstrated that soy protein compared to gluten protein resulted in higher 24 hr systolic BP by 2.3 mmHg (p = 0.003), a higher daytime systolic BP by 3.4 mmHg (p = 0.0002) and a higher daytime diastolic BP by 1.4 mmHg (p = 0.008). Overall 24 hr diastolic BP, night systolic BP and night diastolic BP were not significantly different between groups. Furthermore, soy protein compared to gluten protein resulted in higher 24 hr heart rates by 3.5 bpm (p <0.0001). Conclusions: In hypertensive subjects, compared to gluten placebo, soy dietary supplementation containing isoflavones had no effect on arteria

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M3 - Article

VL - 25

SP - 533

EP - 540

JO - Journal of the American College of Nutrition

JF - Journal of the American College of Nutrition

SN - 0731-5724

IS - 6

ER -