Quantifying susceptibility of CD4+ stem memory T-cells to infection by laboratory adapted and clinical HIV-1 strains

Jacqueline Kaye Flynn, Geza Paukovics, Kieran Cashin, Katharina Borm, Anne M Ellett, Michael John Roche, Martin Roelsgaard Jakobsen, Melissa J Churchill, Paul R Gorry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Abstract: CD4+ T cells are principal targets for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. CD4+ T cell subsets are heterogeneous cell populations, divided by functional and phenotypic differences into naive and memory T cells. The memory CD4+ T cells are further segregated into central, effector and transitional memory cell subsets by functional, phenotypic and homeostatic characteristics. Defining the distribution of HIV-1 infection in different T cell subsets is important, as this can play a role in determining the size and composition of the viral reservoir. Both central memory and transitional memory CD4+ T cells have been described as long-lived viral reservoirs for HIV. Recently, the newly described stem memory T cell subset has also been implicated as a long-lived HIV reservoir. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter strains of HIV-1 and multi parameter flow cytometry, we developed an assay to simultaneously quantify the susceptibility of stem memory (TSCM), central memory, effector memory, transitional memory and naive CD4+ T cell subsets, to HIV-1 infection in vitro. We show that TSCM are susceptible to infection with laboratory adapted and clinical HIV-1 strains. Our system facilitates the quantitation of HIV-1 infection in alternative T cell subsets by CCR5- and CXCR4-using viruses across different HIV-1 subtypes, and will be useful for studies of HIV-1 pathogenesis and viral reservoirs.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)709 - 726
Number of pages18
JournalViruses
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Cite this

Flynn, Jacqueline Kaye ; Paukovics, Geza ; Cashin, Kieran ; Borm, Katharina ; Ellett, Anne M ; Roche, Michael John ; Jakobsen, Martin Roelsgaard ; Churchill, Melissa J ; Gorry, Paul R. / Quantifying susceptibility of CD4+ stem memory T-cells to infection by laboratory adapted and clinical HIV-1 strains. In: Viruses. 2014 ; Vol. 6, No. 2. pp. 709 - 726.
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abstract = "Abstract: CD4+ T cells are principal targets for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. CD4+ T cell subsets are heterogeneous cell populations, divided by functional and phenotypic differences into naive and memory T cells. The memory CD4+ T cells are further segregated into central, effector and transitional memory cell subsets by functional, phenotypic and homeostatic characteristics. Defining the distribution of HIV-1 infection in different T cell subsets is important, as this can play a role in determining the size and composition of the viral reservoir. Both central memory and transitional memory CD4+ T cells have been described as long-lived viral reservoirs for HIV. Recently, the newly described stem memory T cell subset has also been implicated as a long-lived HIV reservoir. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter strains of HIV-1 and multi parameter flow cytometry, we developed an assay to simultaneously quantify the susceptibility of stem memory (TSCM), central memory, effector memory, transitional memory and naive CD4+ T cell subsets, to HIV-1 infection in vitro. We show that TSCM are susceptible to infection with laboratory adapted and clinical HIV-1 strains. Our system facilitates the quantitation of HIV-1 infection in alternative T cell subsets by CCR5- and CXCR4-using viruses across different HIV-1 subtypes, and will be useful for studies of HIV-1 pathogenesis and viral reservoirs.",
author = "Flynn, {Jacqueline Kaye} and Geza Paukovics and Kieran Cashin and Katharina Borm and Ellett, {Anne M} and Roche, {Michael John} and Jakobsen, {Martin Roelsgaard} and Churchill, {Melissa J} and Gorry, {Paul R}",
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Flynn, JK, Paukovics, G, Cashin, K, Borm, K, Ellett, AM, Roche, MJ, Jakobsen, MR, Churchill, MJ & Gorry, PR 2014, 'Quantifying susceptibility of CD4+ stem memory T-cells to infection by laboratory adapted and clinical HIV-1 strains', Viruses, vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 709 - 726. https://doi.org/10.3390/v6020709

Quantifying susceptibility of CD4+ stem memory T-cells to infection by laboratory adapted and clinical HIV-1 strains. / Flynn, Jacqueline Kaye; Paukovics, Geza; Cashin, Kieran; Borm, Katharina; Ellett, Anne M; Roche, Michael John; Jakobsen, Martin Roelsgaard; Churchill, Melissa J; Gorry, Paul R.

In: Viruses, Vol. 6, No. 2, 2014, p. 709 - 726.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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T1 - Quantifying susceptibility of CD4+ stem memory T-cells to infection by laboratory adapted and clinical HIV-1 strains

AU - Flynn, Jacqueline Kaye

AU - Paukovics, Geza

AU - Cashin, Kieran

AU - Borm, Katharina

AU - Ellett, Anne M

AU - Roche, Michael John

AU - Jakobsen, Martin Roelsgaard

AU - Churchill, Melissa J

AU - Gorry, Paul R

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N2 - Abstract: CD4+ T cells are principal targets for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. CD4+ T cell subsets are heterogeneous cell populations, divided by functional and phenotypic differences into naive and memory T cells. The memory CD4+ T cells are further segregated into central, effector and transitional memory cell subsets by functional, phenotypic and homeostatic characteristics. Defining the distribution of HIV-1 infection in different T cell subsets is important, as this can play a role in determining the size and composition of the viral reservoir. Both central memory and transitional memory CD4+ T cells have been described as long-lived viral reservoirs for HIV. Recently, the newly described stem memory T cell subset has also been implicated as a long-lived HIV reservoir. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter strains of HIV-1 and multi parameter flow cytometry, we developed an assay to simultaneously quantify the susceptibility of stem memory (TSCM), central memory, effector memory, transitional memory and naive CD4+ T cell subsets, to HIV-1 infection in vitro. We show that TSCM are susceptible to infection with laboratory adapted and clinical HIV-1 strains. Our system facilitates the quantitation of HIV-1 infection in alternative T cell subsets by CCR5- and CXCR4-using viruses across different HIV-1 subtypes, and will be useful for studies of HIV-1 pathogenesis and viral reservoirs.

AB - Abstract: CD4+ T cells are principal targets for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. CD4+ T cell subsets are heterogeneous cell populations, divided by functional and phenotypic differences into naive and memory T cells. The memory CD4+ T cells are further segregated into central, effector and transitional memory cell subsets by functional, phenotypic and homeostatic characteristics. Defining the distribution of HIV-1 infection in different T cell subsets is important, as this can play a role in determining the size and composition of the viral reservoir. Both central memory and transitional memory CD4+ T cells have been described as long-lived viral reservoirs for HIV. Recently, the newly described stem memory T cell subset has also been implicated as a long-lived HIV reservoir. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter strains of HIV-1 and multi parameter flow cytometry, we developed an assay to simultaneously quantify the susceptibility of stem memory (TSCM), central memory, effector memory, transitional memory and naive CD4+ T cell subsets, to HIV-1 infection in vitro. We show that TSCM are susceptible to infection with laboratory adapted and clinical HIV-1 strains. Our system facilitates the quantitation of HIV-1 infection in alternative T cell subsets by CCR5- and CXCR4-using viruses across different HIV-1 subtypes, and will be useful for studies of HIV-1 pathogenesis and viral reservoirs.

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U2 - 10.3390/v6020709

DO - 10.3390/v6020709

M3 - Article

VL - 6

SP - 709

EP - 726

JO - Viruses

JF - Viruses

SN - 1999-4915

IS - 2

ER -