Quality of Life and Functional Outcomes 12 Months After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

Karen Smith, Emily Andrew, Marijana Lijovic, Ziad Nehme, Stephen Bernard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Background—Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a significant global health problem. There has been considerable investment in improving the emergency medical response to OHCA, with associated improvements in survival. However, concern remains that survivors have a poor quality of life. This study describes the quality of life of OHCA survivors at 1-year postarrest in Victoria, Australia. Methods and Results—Adult OHCA patients who arrested between 2010 and 2012 were identified from the Victorian Ambulance Cardiac Arrest Registry. Paramedics attended 15 113 OHCA patients of which 46.3% received an attempted resuscitation. Nine hundred and twenty-seven (13.2%) survived to hospital discharge of which 76 (8.2%) died within 12 months. Interviews were conducted with 697 (80.7%) patients or proxies, who were followed-up via telephone interview, including the Glasgow Outcome Scale–Extended, the 12-item short form health survey, and the EuroQol. The majority (55.6%) of respondents had a good recovery via the Glasgow Outcome Scale–Extended≥7 (41.1% if patients who died postdischarge were included and nonrespondents were assumed to have poor recovery). The mean EuroQol index score for respondents was 0.82 (standard deviation, 0.19), which compared favorably with an adjusted population norm of 0.81 (standard deviation, 0.34). The mean 12-item short form Mental Component Summary score for patients was 53.0 (standard deviation, 10.2), whereas the mean Physical Component Summary score was 46.1 (standard deviation, 11.2). Conclusions—This is the largest published study assessing the quality of life of OHCA survivors. It provides good evidence that many survivors have an acceptable quality of life 12 months postarrest, particularly in comparison with population norms.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)174-181
Number of pages8
JournalCirculation
Volume131
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 13 Jan 2015

Keywords

  • follow-up studies
  • heart arrest
  • prognosis
  • registries
  • resuscitation

Cite this

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title = "Quality of Life and Functional Outcomes 12 Months After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest",
abstract = "Background—Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a significant global health problem. There has been considerable investment in improving the emergency medical response to OHCA, with associated improvements in survival. However, concern remains that survivors have a poor quality of life. This study describes the quality of life of OHCA survivors at 1-year postarrest in Victoria, Australia. Methods and Results—Adult OHCA patients who arrested between 2010 and 2012 were identified from the Victorian Ambulance Cardiac Arrest Registry. Paramedics attended 15 113 OHCA patients of which 46.3{\%} received an attempted resuscitation. Nine hundred and twenty-seven (13.2{\%}) survived to hospital discharge of which 76 (8.2{\%}) died within 12 months. Interviews were conducted with 697 (80.7{\%}) patients or proxies, who were followed-up via telephone interview, including the Glasgow Outcome Scale–Extended, the 12-item short form health survey, and the EuroQol. The majority (55.6{\%}) of respondents had a good recovery via the Glasgow Outcome Scale–Extended≥7 (41.1{\%} if patients who died postdischarge were included and nonrespondents were assumed to have poor recovery). The mean EuroQol index score for respondents was 0.82 (standard deviation, 0.19), which compared favorably with an adjusted population norm of 0.81 (standard deviation, 0.34). The mean 12-item short form Mental Component Summary score for patients was 53.0 (standard deviation, 10.2), whereas the mean Physical Component Summary score was 46.1 (standard deviation, 11.2). Conclusions—This is the largest published study assessing the quality of life of OHCA survivors. It provides good evidence that many survivors have an acceptable quality of life 12 months postarrest, particularly in comparison with population norms.",
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author = "Karen Smith and Emily Andrew and Marijana Lijovic and Ziad Nehme and Stephen Bernard",
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Quality of Life and Functional Outcomes 12 Months After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest. / Smith, Karen; Andrew, Emily; Lijovic, Marijana; Nehme, Ziad; Bernard, Stephen.

In: Circulation, Vol. 131, No. 2, 13.01.2015, p. 174-181.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Quality of Life and Functional Outcomes 12 Months After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

AU - Smith, Karen

AU - Andrew, Emily

AU - Lijovic, Marijana

AU - Nehme, Ziad

AU - Bernard, Stephen

PY - 2015/1/13

Y1 - 2015/1/13

N2 - Background—Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a significant global health problem. There has been considerable investment in improving the emergency medical response to OHCA, with associated improvements in survival. However, concern remains that survivors have a poor quality of life. This study describes the quality of life of OHCA survivors at 1-year postarrest in Victoria, Australia. Methods and Results—Adult OHCA patients who arrested between 2010 and 2012 were identified from the Victorian Ambulance Cardiac Arrest Registry. Paramedics attended 15 113 OHCA patients of which 46.3% received an attempted resuscitation. Nine hundred and twenty-seven (13.2%) survived to hospital discharge of which 76 (8.2%) died within 12 months. Interviews were conducted with 697 (80.7%) patients or proxies, who were followed-up via telephone interview, including the Glasgow Outcome Scale–Extended, the 12-item short form health survey, and the EuroQol. The majority (55.6%) of respondents had a good recovery via the Glasgow Outcome Scale–Extended≥7 (41.1% if patients who died postdischarge were included and nonrespondents were assumed to have poor recovery). The mean EuroQol index score for respondents was 0.82 (standard deviation, 0.19), which compared favorably with an adjusted population norm of 0.81 (standard deviation, 0.34). The mean 12-item short form Mental Component Summary score for patients was 53.0 (standard deviation, 10.2), whereas the mean Physical Component Summary score was 46.1 (standard deviation, 11.2). Conclusions—This is the largest published study assessing the quality of life of OHCA survivors. It provides good evidence that many survivors have an acceptable quality of life 12 months postarrest, particularly in comparison with population norms.

AB - Background—Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a significant global health problem. There has been considerable investment in improving the emergency medical response to OHCA, with associated improvements in survival. However, concern remains that survivors have a poor quality of life. This study describes the quality of life of OHCA survivors at 1-year postarrest in Victoria, Australia. Methods and Results—Adult OHCA patients who arrested between 2010 and 2012 were identified from the Victorian Ambulance Cardiac Arrest Registry. Paramedics attended 15 113 OHCA patients of which 46.3% received an attempted resuscitation. Nine hundred and twenty-seven (13.2%) survived to hospital discharge of which 76 (8.2%) died within 12 months. Interviews were conducted with 697 (80.7%) patients or proxies, who were followed-up via telephone interview, including the Glasgow Outcome Scale–Extended, the 12-item short form health survey, and the EuroQol. The majority (55.6%) of respondents had a good recovery via the Glasgow Outcome Scale–Extended≥7 (41.1% if patients who died postdischarge were included and nonrespondents were assumed to have poor recovery). The mean EuroQol index score for respondents was 0.82 (standard deviation, 0.19), which compared favorably with an adjusted population norm of 0.81 (standard deviation, 0.34). The mean 12-item short form Mental Component Summary score for patients was 53.0 (standard deviation, 10.2), whereas the mean Physical Component Summary score was 46.1 (standard deviation, 11.2). Conclusions—This is the largest published study assessing the quality of life of OHCA survivors. It provides good evidence that many survivors have an acceptable quality of life 12 months postarrest, particularly in comparison with population norms.

KW - follow-up studies

KW - heart arrest

KW - prognosis

KW - registries

KW - resuscitation

U2 - 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.114.011200

DO - 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.114.011200

M3 - Article

VL - 131

SP - 174

EP - 181

JO - Circulation

JF - Circulation

SN - 0009-7322

IS - 2

ER -