Quality of life and 1-year survival in patients with early septic shock: long-term follow-up of the Australasian Resuscitation in Sepsis Evaluation Trial

Alisa M. Higgins, Sandra L. Peake, Rinaldo Bellomo, D. Jamie Cooper, Anthony Delaney, Anthony H. Harris, Belinda D. Howe, Alistair D. Nichol, Steve A. Webb, Tricia Williams, on behalf of the Australasian Resuscitation in Sepsis Evaluation (ARISE) Investigators, on behalf of the ANZICS Clinical Trials Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: To examine long-term survival and quality of life of patients with early septic shock.
Design: Prospective, randomized, parallel-group trial.
Setting: Fifty-one hospitals in Australia, New Zealand, Finland, Hong Kong, and the Republic of Ireland.
Patients: One-thousand five-hundred ninety-one patients who presented to the emergency department with early septic shock between October 2008 and April 2014, and were enrolled in the Australasian Resuscitation in Sepsis Evaluation trial.
Interventions: Early goal-directed therapy versus usual care.
Measurements and Main Results: Long-term survival was measured up to 12 months postrandomization. Health-related quality of life was measured using the EuroQoL-5D-3L, Short Form 36 and Assessment of Quality of Life 4D at baseline, and at 6 and 12 months following randomization. Mortality data were available for 1,548 patients (97.3%) and 1,515 patients (95.2%) at 6 and 12 months, respectively. Health-related quality of life data were available for 85.1% of survivors at 12 months. There were no significant differences in mortality between groups at either 6 months (early goal-directed therapy 21.8% vs usual care 22.6%; p = 0.70) or 12 months (early goal-directed therapy 26.4% vs usual care 27.9%; p = 0.50). There were no group differences in health-related quality of life at either 6 or 12 months (EuroQoL-5D-3L utility scores at 12 mo early goal-directed therapy 0.65 ± 0.33 vs usual care 0.64 ± 0.34; p = 0.50), with the health-related quality of life of both groups being significantly lower than population norms.
Conclusions: In patients presenting to the emergency department with early septic shock, early goal-directed therapy compared with usual care did not reduce mortality nor improve health-related quality of life at either 6 or 12 months.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)765-773
Number of pages9
JournalCritical Care Medicine
Volume47
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2019

Cite this

@article{10748dd667ea455c9a935ef96ac14a24,
title = "Quality of life and 1-year survival in patients with early septic shock: long-term follow-up of the Australasian Resuscitation in Sepsis Evaluation Trial",
abstract = "Objectives: To examine long-term survival and quality of life of patients with early septic shock.Design: Prospective, randomized, parallel-group trial.Setting: Fifty-one hospitals in Australia, New Zealand, Finland, Hong Kong, and the Republic of Ireland.Patients: One-thousand five-hundred ninety-one patients who presented to the emergency department with early septic shock between October 2008 and April 2014, and were enrolled in the Australasian Resuscitation in Sepsis Evaluation trial.Interventions: Early goal-directed therapy versus usual care.Measurements and Main Results: Long-term survival was measured up to 12 months postrandomization. Health-related quality of life was measured using the EuroQoL-5D-3L, Short Form 36 and Assessment of Quality of Life 4D at baseline, and at 6 and 12 months following randomization. Mortality data were available for 1,548 patients (97.3{\%}) and 1,515 patients (95.2{\%}) at 6 and 12 months, respectively. Health-related quality of life data were available for 85.1{\%} of survivors at 12 months. There were no significant differences in mortality between groups at either 6 months (early goal-directed therapy 21.8{\%} vs usual care 22.6{\%}; p = 0.70) or 12 months (early goal-directed therapy 26.4{\%} vs usual care 27.9{\%}; p = 0.50). There were no group differences in health-related quality of life at either 6 or 12 months (EuroQoL-5D-3L utility scores at 12 mo early goal-directed therapy 0.65 ± 0.33 vs usual care 0.64 ± 0.34; p = 0.50), with the health-related quality of life of both groups being significantly lower than population norms.Conclusions: In patients presenting to the emergency department with early septic shock, early goal-directed therapy compared with usual care did not reduce mortality nor improve health-related quality of life at either 6 or 12 months.",
author = "Higgins, {Alisa M.} and Peake, {Sandra L.} and Rinaldo Bellomo and Cooper, {D. Jamie} and Anthony Delaney and Harris, {Anthony H.} and Howe, {Belinda D.} and Nichol, {Alistair D.} and Webb, {Steve A.} and Tricia Williams and {on behalf of the Australasian Resuscitation in Sepsis Evaluation (ARISE) Investigators} and {on behalf of the ANZICS Clinical Trials Group}",
year = "2019",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1097/CCM.0000000000003762",
language = "English",
volume = "47",
pages = "765--773",
journal = "Critical Care Medicine",
issn = "0090-3493",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams & Wilkins",
number = "6",

}

Quality of life and 1-year survival in patients with early septic shock : long-term follow-up of the Australasian Resuscitation in Sepsis Evaluation Trial. / Higgins, Alisa M.; Peake, Sandra L.; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Cooper, D. Jamie; Delaney, Anthony; Harris, Anthony H.; Howe, Belinda D.; Nichol, Alistair D.; Webb, Steve A.; Williams, Tricia; on behalf of the Australasian Resuscitation in Sepsis Evaluation (ARISE) Investigators; on behalf of the ANZICS Clinical Trials Group.

In: Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 47, No. 6, 06.2019, p. 765-773.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Quality of life and 1-year survival in patients with early septic shock

T2 - long-term follow-up of the Australasian Resuscitation in Sepsis Evaluation Trial

AU - Higgins, Alisa M.

AU - Peake, Sandra L.

AU - Bellomo, Rinaldo

AU - Cooper, D. Jamie

AU - Delaney, Anthony

AU - Harris, Anthony H.

AU - Howe, Belinda D.

AU - Nichol, Alistair D.

AU - Webb, Steve A.

AU - Williams, Tricia

AU - on behalf of the Australasian Resuscitation in Sepsis Evaluation (ARISE) Investigators

AU - on behalf of the ANZICS Clinical Trials Group

PY - 2019/6

Y1 - 2019/6

N2 - Objectives: To examine long-term survival and quality of life of patients with early septic shock.Design: Prospective, randomized, parallel-group trial.Setting: Fifty-one hospitals in Australia, New Zealand, Finland, Hong Kong, and the Republic of Ireland.Patients: One-thousand five-hundred ninety-one patients who presented to the emergency department with early septic shock between October 2008 and April 2014, and were enrolled in the Australasian Resuscitation in Sepsis Evaluation trial.Interventions: Early goal-directed therapy versus usual care.Measurements and Main Results: Long-term survival was measured up to 12 months postrandomization. Health-related quality of life was measured using the EuroQoL-5D-3L, Short Form 36 and Assessment of Quality of Life 4D at baseline, and at 6 and 12 months following randomization. Mortality data were available for 1,548 patients (97.3%) and 1,515 patients (95.2%) at 6 and 12 months, respectively. Health-related quality of life data were available for 85.1% of survivors at 12 months. There were no significant differences in mortality between groups at either 6 months (early goal-directed therapy 21.8% vs usual care 22.6%; p = 0.70) or 12 months (early goal-directed therapy 26.4% vs usual care 27.9%; p = 0.50). There were no group differences in health-related quality of life at either 6 or 12 months (EuroQoL-5D-3L utility scores at 12 mo early goal-directed therapy 0.65 ± 0.33 vs usual care 0.64 ± 0.34; p = 0.50), with the health-related quality of life of both groups being significantly lower than population norms.Conclusions: In patients presenting to the emergency department with early septic shock, early goal-directed therapy compared with usual care did not reduce mortality nor improve health-related quality of life at either 6 or 12 months.

AB - Objectives: To examine long-term survival and quality of life of patients with early septic shock.Design: Prospective, randomized, parallel-group trial.Setting: Fifty-one hospitals in Australia, New Zealand, Finland, Hong Kong, and the Republic of Ireland.Patients: One-thousand five-hundred ninety-one patients who presented to the emergency department with early septic shock between October 2008 and April 2014, and were enrolled in the Australasian Resuscitation in Sepsis Evaluation trial.Interventions: Early goal-directed therapy versus usual care.Measurements and Main Results: Long-term survival was measured up to 12 months postrandomization. Health-related quality of life was measured using the EuroQoL-5D-3L, Short Form 36 and Assessment of Quality of Life 4D at baseline, and at 6 and 12 months following randomization. Mortality data were available for 1,548 patients (97.3%) and 1,515 patients (95.2%) at 6 and 12 months, respectively. Health-related quality of life data were available for 85.1% of survivors at 12 months. There were no significant differences in mortality between groups at either 6 months (early goal-directed therapy 21.8% vs usual care 22.6%; p = 0.70) or 12 months (early goal-directed therapy 26.4% vs usual care 27.9%; p = 0.50). There were no group differences in health-related quality of life at either 6 or 12 months (EuroQoL-5D-3L utility scores at 12 mo early goal-directed therapy 0.65 ± 0.33 vs usual care 0.64 ± 0.34; p = 0.50), with the health-related quality of life of both groups being significantly lower than population norms.Conclusions: In patients presenting to the emergency department with early septic shock, early goal-directed therapy compared with usual care did not reduce mortality nor improve health-related quality of life at either 6 or 12 months.

U2 - 10.1097/CCM.0000000000003762

DO - 10.1097/CCM.0000000000003762

M3 - Article

VL - 47

SP - 765

EP - 773

JO - Critical Care Medicine

JF - Critical Care Medicine

SN - 0090-3493

IS - 6

ER -