Pupil Speech during Morning News: The effects of reducing teacher questions and increasing pauses and praise

Dennis W. Moore, Tony Knott, Stuart McNaughton

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4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Classroom discourse patterns were examined in the morning news sessions of a primary school classroom. The effects of reducing teacher questions and increasing rates of teacher pauses, praise and directives were investigated. Child words spoken and child expansions were recorded, as well as class call-outs and teacher control statements. Frequencies of child words spoken showed no significant changes across the phases of the study. However, reducing teacher questions and increasing teacher pauses significantly decreased child expansions, while reducing teacher questions and increasing teacher praise significantly increased child expansions. Replacing teacher questions with directives had no significant effect upon child expansions. Class call-outs and teacher control statements showed no significant changes across the intervention phases. The results of this study suggest that, for this teacher and class, teacher questions may be decreased without adversely affecting either child utterances or class behaviour, and that replacing questions with praise may increase children's contributions—particularly in the form of verbal expansions—to morning news talks.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)311-320
Number of pages10
JournalEducational Psychology
Volume9
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1989
Externally publishedYes

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