Public Attitudes, Behaviors, and Beliefs Related to COVID-19, Stay-at-Home Orders, Nonessential Business Closures, and Public Health Guidance - United States, New York City, and Los Angeles, May 5-12, 2020

Mark E. Czeisler, Michael A. Tynan, Mark E. Howard, Sally Honeycutt, Erika B. Fulmer, Daniel P. Kidder, Rebecca Robbins, Laura K. Barger, Elise R. Facer-Childs, Grant Baldwin, Shantha M.W. Rajaratnam, Charles A. Czeisler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), is thought to be transmitted mainly by person-to-person contact (1). Implementation of nationwide public health orders to limit person-to-person interaction and of guidance on personal protective practices can slow transmission (2,3). Such strategies can include stay-at-home orders, business closures, prohibitions against mass gatherings, use of cloth face coverings, and maintenance of a physical distance between persons (2,3). To assess and understand public attitudes, behaviors, and beliefs related to this guidance and COVID-19, representative panel surveys were conducted among adults aged ≥18 years in New York City (NYC) and Los Angeles, and broadly across the United States during May 5-12, 2020. Most respondents in the three cohorts supported stay-at-home orders and nonessential business closures* (United States, 79.5%; New York City, 86.7%; and Los Angeles, 81.5%), reported always or often wearing cloth face coverings in public areas (United States, 74.1%, New York City, 89.6%; and Los Angeles 89.8%), and believed that their state's restrictions were the right balance or not restrictive enough (United States, 84.3%; New York City, 89.7%; and Los Angeles, 79.7%). Periodic assessments of public attitudes, behaviors, and beliefs can guide evidence-based public health decision-making and related prevention messaging about mitigation strategies needed as the COVID-19 pandemic evolves.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)751-758
Number of pages8
JournalMorbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
Volume69
Issue number24
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 19 Jun 2020

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