Psychosocial working conditions and suicide ideation: Evidence from a cross-sectional survey of working Australians

Allison Milner, Kathryn Page, Katrina Witt, Anthony Lamontagne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: This study examined the relationship between psychosocial working factors such as job control, job demands, job insecurity, supervisor support, and workplace bullying as risk factors for suicide ideation.

METHODS: We used a logistic analytic approach to assess risk factors for thoughts of suicide in a cross-sectional sample of working Australians. Potential predictors included psychosocial job stressors (described above); we also controlled for age, gender, occupational skill level, and psychological distress.

RESULTS: We found that workplace bullying or harassment was associated with 1.54 greater odds of suicide ideation (95% confidence interval 1.64 to 2.05) in the model including psychological distress. Results also suggest that higher job control and security were associated with lower odds of suicide ideation.

CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest the need for organizational level intervention to address psychosocial job stressors, including bullying.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)584-587
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume58
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016
Externally publishedYes

Cite this

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abstract = "OBJECTIVES: This study examined the relationship between psychosocial working factors such as job control, job demands, job insecurity, supervisor support, and workplace bullying as risk factors for suicide ideation. METHODS: We used a logistic analytic approach to assess risk factors for thoughts of suicide in a cross-sectional sample of working Australians. Potential predictors included psychosocial job stressors (described above); we also controlled for age, gender, occupational skill level, and psychological distress. RESULTS: We found that workplace bullying or harassment was associated with 1.54 greater odds of suicide ideation (95{\%} confidence interval 1.64 to 2.05) in the model including psychological distress. Results also suggest that higher job control and security were associated with lower odds of suicide ideation. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest the need for organizational level intervention to address psychosocial job stressors, including bullying.",
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Psychosocial working conditions and suicide ideation : Evidence from a cross-sectional survey of working Australians. / Milner, Allison; Page, Kathryn; Witt, Katrina; Lamontagne, Anthony.

In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Vol. 58, No. 6, 2016, p. 584-587.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Witt, Katrina

AU - Lamontagne, Anthony

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AB - OBJECTIVES: This study examined the relationship between psychosocial working factors such as job control, job demands, job insecurity, supervisor support, and workplace bullying as risk factors for suicide ideation. METHODS: We used a logistic analytic approach to assess risk factors for thoughts of suicide in a cross-sectional sample of working Australians. Potential predictors included psychosocial job stressors (described above); we also controlled for age, gender, occupational skill level, and psychological distress. RESULTS: We found that workplace bullying or harassment was associated with 1.54 greater odds of suicide ideation (95% confidence interval 1.64 to 2.05) in the model including psychological distress. Results also suggest that higher job control and security were associated with lower odds of suicide ideation. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest the need for organizational level intervention to address psychosocial job stressors, including bullying.

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