Psychosocial support, treatment of metastatic disease and palliative care

Michael A. Ashby, David W. Kissane, Geoffrey F. Beadle, Alan Rodger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

This article deals with four linked but distinct aspects of care for women with breast cancer, with an emphasis on the pivotal role of the general practitioner: 1. Modern medicine is fast recognising the need for psychosocial support of patients; in fact, for an integrated approach to caring for the whole person at all stages of illness. 2. Oncological treatment of metastatic disease needs to be individualised and based on realistic expectations of outcome balanced against side effects. 3. An open dialogue about the role and appropriateness of so-called "alternative"or "complementary" therapies is needed. 4. Despite significant improvements in palliative care quality and access in Australia in the last decade, many practitioners still require support and advice in this demanding area of care (particularly about difficult symptom control).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)43-49
Number of pages7
JournalMedical Journal of Australia
Volume164
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1996

Cite this

Ashby, Michael A. ; Kissane, David W. ; Beadle, Geoffrey F. ; Rodger, Alan. / Psychosocial support, treatment of metastatic disease and palliative care. In: Medical Journal of Australia. 1996 ; Vol. 164, No. 1. pp. 43-49.
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Psychosocial support, treatment of metastatic disease and palliative care. / Ashby, Michael A.; Kissane, David W.; Beadle, Geoffrey F.; Rodger, Alan.

In: Medical Journal of Australia, Vol. 164, No. 1, 01.01.1996, p. 43-49.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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