Psychometric properties of Child Health Utility 9D (CHU9D) proxy version administered to parents and caregivers of children aged 2–4 years compared with Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory™ (PedsQL)

Xiuqin Xiong, Natalie Carvalho, Li Huang, Gang Chen, Renee Jones, Nancy Devlin, Brendan Mulhern, Kim Dalziel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

Objective: This study examines the psychometric properties of the Child Health Utility 9D (CHU9D) proxy version administered to parents/caregivers of 2–4-year-old Australian children compared with Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory™ version 4.0 (PedsQL). Methods: Data collected in 2021/2022 from parents/caregivers of 2–4-year-olds from the Australian pediatric multi-instrument comparison study were used. Feasibility, ceiling/floor effects, test–retest reliability, convergent validity, known-group validity, and responsiveness were assessed. Results: A total of 842 caregivers completed the survey at baseline, with 513 completing the follow-up survey. The CHU9D did not demonstrate ceiling effects in the sample with special health care needs, with only 6% of respondents reporting best levels for all nine dimensions. CHU9D correlated with PedsQL moderately-to-strongly between comparable items (correlation coefficients 0.34–0.70). CHU9D was able to differentiate between groups with known health differences with moderate-to-large effect sizes (Cohen’s d 0.58–2.03). Moderate test–retest reliability was found for CHU9D in those reporting no health change at a 2-day follow-up (ICC 0.52). A standard response mean (SRM) of 0.25–0.44 was found for children with changes in general health and a SRM of 0.72–0.82 for children who reported worsened health when developing new illnesses, indicating small-to-large responsiveness according to different definitions of health changes. Compared with PedsQL, CHU9D had similar known-group validity and responsiveness and slightly poorer test–retest reliability. Conclusion: The CHU9D was found to be valid and reliable to measure health-related quality-of-life in children aged 2–4 years, although with relatively low test–retest reliability in some dimensions. Further development and validation work is warranted.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages15
JournalPharmacoEconomics
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2024

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