Providing a check on Prosecutorial decision-making: An analysis of the Victims' Right to Review reform

Mary Iliadis, Asher Flynn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The Victims’ Right to Review (VRR) enables victims to request a review of a prosecutor’s previously finite decision not to proceed with charges; the outcome of which can include a reversal of that decision. Informed by the voices of those involved in the VRR’s development and operation, and a quantitative dataset unique to our study, this article analyses the VRR process and outcomes two years post its implementation. Ultimately, we argue that despite being a primary aim of the reform, transparency, accessibility and accountability concerns may hinder the VRR’s capacity to address victims’ procedural justice needs (information, voice, control, validation), thereby reducing its effectiveness.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)550–568
Number of pages18
JournalBritish Journal of Criminology
Volume58
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Keywords

  • Victims' Right to Review
  • prosecutorial discretion
  • procedural justice
  • victims' rights

Cite this

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Providing a check on Prosecutorial decision-making: An analysis of the Victims' Right to Review reform. / Iliadis, Mary; Flynn, Asher.

In: British Journal of Criminology, Vol. 58, No. 3 , 2018, p. 550–568.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Flynn, Asher

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KW - prosecutorial discretion

KW - procedural justice

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