Protocol for development and validation of a clinical prediction model for adverse pregnancy outcomes in women with gestational diabetes

Shamil D. Cooray, Jacqueline A. Boyle, Georgia Soldatos, Javier Zamora, Borja M. Fernández Félix, John Allotey, Shakila Thangaratinam, Helena J. Teede

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleOtherpeer-review

Abstract

Introduction Gestational diabetes (GDM) is a common yet highly heterogeneous condition. The ability to calculate the absolute risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes for an individual woman with GDM would allow preventative and therapeutic interventions to be delivered to women at high-risk, sparing women at low-risk from unnecessary care. The Prediction for Risk-Stratified care for women with GDM (PeRSonal GDM) study will develop, validate and evaluate the clinical utility of a prediction model for adverse pregnancy outcomes in women with GDM. Methods and analysis We undertook formative research to conceptualise and design the prediction model. Informed by these findings, we will conduct a model development and validation study using a retrospective cohort design with participant data collected as part of routine clinical care across three hospitals. The study will include all pregnancies resulting in births from 1 July 2017 to 31 December 2018 coded for a diagnosis of GDM (estimated sample size 2430 pregnancies). We will use a temporal split-sample development and validation strategy. A multivariable logistic regression model will be fitted. The performance of this model will be assessed, and the validated model will also be evaluated using decision curve analysis. Finally, we will explore modes of model presentation suited to clinical use, including electronic risk calculators. Ethics and dissemination This study was approved by the Human Research Ethics Committee of Monash Health (RES-19-0000713 L). We will disseminate results via presentations at scientific meetings and publication in peer-reviewed journals. Trial registration details Systematic review proceeding this work was registered on PROSPERO (CRD42019115223) and the study was registered on the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12620000915954); Pre-results.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere038845
Number of pages11
JournalBMJ Open
Volume10
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 Nov 2020

Keywords

  • diabetes in pregnancy
  • obstetrics
  • public health

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