Prospective evaluation of first and last memory reports following moderate to severe traumatic brain injury

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Prospective monitoring of posttraumatic amnesia (PTA) status is recommended following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Use of patients’ subjective reports is, however, still common and necessary in some circumstances. It is therefore important to understand how patients’ self-reported first memories relate to prospective measures and how reliable these reports remain over time. In the present study, patients with moderate–severe TBI in PTA were asked about their first and last memories surrounding the injury daily and were administered the Westmead Post-Traumatic Amnesia Scale (WPTAS). Following PTA emergence, a semistructured interview was used to ascertain participants’ reports of return of continuous memory after the injury, as well as their last preinjury memory. This interview was repeated six months later, along with the Community Integration Questionnaire to measure functional outcome and the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test to measure anterograde memory. The temporal order of recovery of WPTAS variables and subjective reports was determined, and consistency of subjective reports over time was examined using bivariate correlation and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Findings suggested that patients’ reports of return of continuous memory aligned most closely with return of consistent orientation, and occurred significantly earlier than attainment of criterion on the WPTAS. Reported first memories were significantly later at follow-up (i.e., greater days post injury) and the ICC was not suggestive of adequate clinical reliability. Last memory reports were slightly more reliable, with 71% of cases remaining in the same band at follow-up. Demographic and injury-related variables were not significantly associated with the discrepancy between reports. The variability in patients’ reports over time highlights the importance and value of prospective PTA monitoring.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)109-117
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology
Volume41
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Keywords

  • Orientation
  • posttraumatic amnesia
  • retrograde amnesia
  • traumatic brain injury
  • Westmead Post-Traumatic Amnesia Scale

Cite this

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title = "Prospective evaluation of first and last memory reports following moderate to severe traumatic brain injury",
abstract = "Prospective monitoring of posttraumatic amnesia (PTA) status is recommended following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Use of patients’ subjective reports is, however, still common and necessary in some circumstances. It is therefore important to understand how patients’ self-reported first memories relate to prospective measures and how reliable these reports remain over time. In the present study, patients with moderate–severe TBI in PTA were asked about their first and last memories surrounding the injury daily and were administered the Westmead Post-Traumatic Amnesia Scale (WPTAS). Following PTA emergence, a semistructured interview was used to ascertain participants’ reports of return of continuous memory after the injury, as well as their last preinjury memory. This interview was repeated six months later, along with the Community Integration Questionnaire to measure functional outcome and the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test to measure anterograde memory. The temporal order of recovery of WPTAS variables and subjective reports was determined, and consistency of subjective reports over time was examined using bivariate correlation and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Findings suggested that patients’ reports of return of continuous memory aligned most closely with return of consistent orientation, and occurred significantly earlier than attainment of criterion on the WPTAS. Reported first memories were significantly later at follow-up (i.e., greater days post injury) and the ICC was not suggestive of adequate clinical reliability. Last memory reports were slightly more reliable, with 71{\%} of cases remaining in the same band at follow-up. Demographic and injury-related variables were not significantly associated with the discrepancy between reports. The variability in patients’ reports over time highlights the importance and value of prospective PTA monitoring.",
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Prospective evaluation of first and last memory reports following moderate to severe traumatic brain injury. / Roberts, Caroline M.; Spitz, Gershon; Mundy, Matthew; Ponsford, Jennie L.

In: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, Vol. 41, No. 2, 2019, p. 109-117.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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