Projecting marine developmental diversity and connectivity in future oceans

Dustin J. Marshall, Mariana Alvarez-Noriega

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Global change will alter the distribution of organisms around the planet. While many studies have explored how different species, groups and traits might be re-arranged, few have explored how dispersal is likely to change under future conditions. Dispersal drives ecological and evolutionary dynamics of populations, determining resilience, persistence and spread. In marine systems, dispersal shows clear biogeographical patterns and is extremely dependent on temperature, so simple projections can be made regarding how dispersal potentials are likely to change owing to global warming under future thermal regimes. We use two proxies for dispersal-developmental mode and developmental duration. Species with a larval phase are more dispersive than those that lack a larval phase, and species that spend longer developing in the plankton are more dispersive than those that spend less time in the plankton. Here, we explore how the distribution of different development modes is likely to change based on current distributions. Next, we estimate how the temperature-dependence of development itself depends on the temperature in which the species lives, and use this estimate to project how developmental durations are likely to change in the future. We find that species with feeding larvae are likely to become more prevalent, extending their distribution poleward at the expense of species with aplanktonic development. We predict that developmental durations are likely to decrease, particularly in high latitudes where durations may decline by more than 90%. Overall, we anticipate significant changes to dispersal in marine environments, with species in the polar seas experiencing the greatest change. This article is part of the theme issue 'Integrative research perspectives on marine conservation'.

Original languageEnglish
Article number20190450
Number of pages12
JournalPhilosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Volume375
Issue number1814
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 21 Dec 2020

Keywords

  • dispersal
  • global warming
  • life history
  • marine invertebrates

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