Professional development of New Zealand social workers who engage in psychotherapy: Perceptions and activities

Sarah Calvert, Nikolaos Kazantzis, Paul L Merrick, David E. Orlinsky, Kevin M. Ronan, Barbara Staniforth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Thirty-six New Zealand social workers were surveyed as an extension of a multinational study of therapist development. Comparisons were made with samples of Canadian and USA social workers. New Zealand social workers perceived themselves to have developed in skill and knowledge across the career, but perceptions of current development were low in comparison with Canadian and USA samples. However, New Zealand social workers reported the highest use of supervision, and a large proportion of the sample had also undergone specialist training. While the majority of the sample had undergone personal therapy at some point, use of personal therapy was lower than Canadian and USA social worker samples. In terms of the perceived utility of professional activities, supervision and training were regarded by New Zealand social workers as highly influential activities for professional development. Conversely, personal therapy was rated as minimally influential in professional development in contrast to the North American comparison samples.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)16-31
Number of pages16
JournalAotearoa New Zealand Social Work Journal
Volume21
Publication statusPublished - 2007
Externally publishedYes

Cite this

Calvert, Sarah ; Kazantzis, Nikolaos ; Merrick, Paul L ; Orlinsky, David E. ; Ronan, Kevin M. ; Staniforth, Barbara. / Professional development of New Zealand social workers who engage in psychotherapy : Perceptions and activities. In: Aotearoa New Zealand Social Work Journal. 2007 ; Vol. 21. pp. 16-31.
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Professional development of New Zealand social workers who engage in psychotherapy : Perceptions and activities. / Calvert, Sarah ; Kazantzis, Nikolaos; Merrick, Paul L; Orlinsky, David E.; Ronan, Kevin M.; Staniforth, Barbara.

In: Aotearoa New Zealand Social Work Journal, Vol. 21, 2007, p. 16-31.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Staniforth, Barbara

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