Prevalence and characteristics of pain in children and young adults with cerebral palsy

a systematic review

Clare T. Mckinnon, Elaine M. Meehan, Adrienne R. Harvey, Giuliana C. Antolovich, Prue E. Morgan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: The primary aim of this review is to evaluate the evidence for pain prevalence in children and young adults with cerebral palsy. Secondary aims are to identify pain characteristics and types of pain measurement used in this population. Method: Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL Plus, and PubMed were searched in October 2016 and updated in November 2017. Two authors independently screened studies according to Preferred Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Pain outcomes were categorized within a biopsychosocial pain framework, with pain prevalence extracted for all recall periods and measurement types. Results: One hundred and six publications from 57 studies met inclusion criteria. Pain prevalence varied widely from 14 per cent to 76 per cent and was higher in females, older age groups, and those classified within Gross Motor Function Classification System level V. Pain was most frequent in the lower limbs, back, and abdomen and associated with reduced quality of life or health status. The influence of pain on psychological functioning, interference, and participation was inconclusive. Interpretation: Variation exists in reported pain prevalence because of sampling bias, inconsistent measurement, varying recall periods, and use of different participant age ranges. What this paper adds: Pain prevalence varies from 14 per cent to 76 per cent in children and young adults with cerebral palsy. Pain is more prevalent in females, older age groups, and children in Gross Motor Function Classification System level V.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)305-314
Number of pages11
JournalDevelopmental Medicine and Child Neurology
Volume61
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2019

Cite this

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title = "Prevalence and characteristics of pain in children and young adults with cerebral palsy: a systematic review",
abstract = "Aim: The primary aim of this review is to evaluate the evidence for pain prevalence in children and young adults with cerebral palsy. Secondary aims are to identify pain characteristics and types of pain measurement used in this population. Method: Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL Plus, and PubMed were searched in October 2016 and updated in November 2017. Two authors independently screened studies according to Preferred Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Pain outcomes were categorized within a biopsychosocial pain framework, with pain prevalence extracted for all recall periods and measurement types. Results: One hundred and six publications from 57 studies met inclusion criteria. Pain prevalence varied widely from 14 per cent to 76 per cent and was higher in females, older age groups, and those classified within Gross Motor Function Classification System level V. Pain was most frequent in the lower limbs, back, and abdomen and associated with reduced quality of life or health status. The influence of pain on psychological functioning, interference, and participation was inconclusive. Interpretation: Variation exists in reported pain prevalence because of sampling bias, inconsistent measurement, varying recall periods, and use of different participant age ranges. What this paper adds: Pain prevalence varies from 14 per cent to 76 per cent in children and young adults with cerebral palsy. Pain is more prevalent in females, older age groups, and children in Gross Motor Function Classification System level V.",
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Prevalence and characteristics of pain in children and young adults with cerebral palsy : a systematic review. / Mckinnon, Clare T.; Meehan, Elaine M.; Harvey, Adrienne R.; Antolovich, Giuliana C.; Morgan, Prue E.

In: Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, Vol. 61, No. 3, 03.2019, p. 305-314.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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