Predictors of Onset for Non-suicidal Self-injury Within a School-Based Sample of Adolescents

Tori Andrews, Graham Martin, Penelope Anne Hasking, Andrew Page

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Abstract

This paper reports on a prospective study exploring risk factors specifically related to the onset of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) during adolescence. We examined cumulative incidence and predictors of onset of NSSI over 1 year among 1,973 school-based adolescents (13–19 years old; M = 14.9, SD = 0.96) from five states in Australia. Data showed cumulative incidence of 3.8 % (95 % CI [3.0–4.7 %]) over 1 year. Multiple socio-demographic and psychosocial factors were assessed using sequential logistic regression models. Onset of NSSI was associated with being female (OR = 3.47, 95 % CI [1.48–8.18]), being born outside of Australia (OR = 3.05, 95 % CI [1.10–8.47]), not identifying as religious or spiritual (OR = 1.80, 95 % CI [1.04–3.10]), increased psychological distress (OR = 1.12, 95 % CI [1.08–1.16]), poor social support from family (OR = 0.89, 95 % CI [0.83–0.95]), poor self-esteem (OR = 0.90, 95 % CI [0.83–0.98]), and poor problem-solving coping (OR = 0.90, 95 % CI [0.82–0.99]). These findings may assist to better identify young people more likely to start self-injuring and also highlight issues to provide a focus for prevention initiatives.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)850-859
Number of pages10
JournalPrevention Science
Volume15
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Keywords

  • NSSI
  • Onset
  • Psychosocial risk factors
  • School-based adolescents

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