Predicting consumers pro-environmental behaviour

Harryadin Mahardika, Dominic Thomas, Michael Thomas Ewing

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractOther

Abstract

Consumers who report their concern about environment do not necessarily purchase proenvironmental products. This attitude-behaviour inconsistency is related to researchers’choice of the predictor of pro-environmental behaviour. This paper aims to compares the predictive accuracy of two immediate predictors of pro-environmental behaviour, behavioural intention and behavioural expectation. Results from an online survey indicate that subjects are generally over estimate their judgment toward performing pro-environmental behaviour when responding to behavioural intention questions. Meanwhile, when responding to behavioural expectation questions, subjects were able to make a better estimation toward their likelihood to perform the targeted pro-environmental behaviour. In a more specific comparison between consumers with high and low pro-environmental orientation, the underlying process differences between behavioural intention and behavioural expectation is evident. Subjects who have high pro-environmental orientation were more “honest” about their environment concern, thus they have stable responses toward behavioural intention and behavioural expectation questions. Conversely, subjects who have low pro-environmental orientation responded differently when encounter behavioural intention and behavioural expectation questions. These subjects over estimate their likelihood to perform the targeted pro-environmental behaviour when responding to behavioural intention questions, while under estimate it when responding to behavioural expectation questions. It is clear that subjects who have low pro-environmental behaviour were not taking into account the feasibility of performing the pro-environment behaviour. These results provide a basis for marketers and researchers to embrace behavioural expectation as a better predictor of consumers’ adoption of pro-environmental products
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 2011
EventAustralian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference (ANZMAC 2011) - Perth Convention and Exhibition Centre, Perth WA, Australia
Duration: 28 Nov 201130 Nov 2011

Conference

ConferenceAustralian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference (ANZMAC 2011)
Abbreviated titleANZMAC 2011
CountryAustralia
CityPerth WA
Period28/11/1130/11/11

Cite this

Mahardika, H., Thomas, D., & Ewing, M. T. (2011). Predicting consumers pro-environmental behaviour. Abstract from Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference (ANZMAC 2011), Perth WA, Australia.
Mahardika, Harryadin ; Thomas, Dominic ; Ewing, Michael Thomas. / Predicting consumers pro-environmental behaviour. Abstract from Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference (ANZMAC 2011), Perth WA, Australia.1 p.
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abstract = "Consumers who report their concern about environment do not necessarily purchase proenvironmental products. This attitude-behaviour inconsistency is related to researchers’choice of the predictor of pro-environmental behaviour. This paper aims to compares the predictive accuracy of two immediate predictors of pro-environmental behaviour, behavioural intention and behavioural expectation. Results from an online survey indicate that subjects are generally over estimate their judgment toward performing pro-environmental behaviour when responding to behavioural intention questions. Meanwhile, when responding to behavioural expectation questions, subjects were able to make a better estimation toward their likelihood to perform the targeted pro-environmental behaviour. In a more specific comparison between consumers with high and low pro-environmental orientation, the underlying process differences between behavioural intention and behavioural expectation is evident. Subjects who have high pro-environmental orientation were more “honest” about their environment concern, thus they have stable responses toward behavioural intention and behavioural expectation questions. Conversely, subjects who have low pro-environmental orientation responded differently when encounter behavioural intention and behavioural expectation questions. These subjects over estimate their likelihood to perform the targeted pro-environmental behaviour when responding to behavioural intention questions, while under estimate it when responding to behavioural expectation questions. It is clear that subjects who have low pro-environmental behaviour were not taking into account the feasibility of performing the pro-environment behaviour. These results provide a basis for marketers and researchers to embrace behavioural expectation as a better predictor of consumers’ adoption of pro-environmental products",
author = "Harryadin Mahardika and Dominic Thomas and Ewing, {Michael Thomas}",
year = "2011",
language = "English",
note = "Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference (ANZMAC 2011), ANZMAC 2011 ; Conference date: 28-11-2011 Through 30-11-2011",

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Mahardika, H, Thomas, D & Ewing, MT 2011, 'Predicting consumers pro-environmental behaviour' Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference (ANZMAC 2011), Perth WA, Australia, 28/11/11 - 30/11/11, .

Predicting consumers pro-environmental behaviour. / Mahardika, Harryadin; Thomas, Dominic; Ewing, Michael Thomas.

2011. Abstract from Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference (ANZMAC 2011), Perth WA, Australia.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractOther

TY - CONF

T1 - Predicting consumers pro-environmental behaviour

AU - Mahardika, Harryadin

AU - Thomas, Dominic

AU - Ewing, Michael Thomas

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - Consumers who report their concern about environment do not necessarily purchase proenvironmental products. This attitude-behaviour inconsistency is related to researchers’choice of the predictor of pro-environmental behaviour. This paper aims to compares the predictive accuracy of two immediate predictors of pro-environmental behaviour, behavioural intention and behavioural expectation. Results from an online survey indicate that subjects are generally over estimate their judgment toward performing pro-environmental behaviour when responding to behavioural intention questions. Meanwhile, when responding to behavioural expectation questions, subjects were able to make a better estimation toward their likelihood to perform the targeted pro-environmental behaviour. In a more specific comparison between consumers with high and low pro-environmental orientation, the underlying process differences between behavioural intention and behavioural expectation is evident. Subjects who have high pro-environmental orientation were more “honest” about their environment concern, thus they have stable responses toward behavioural intention and behavioural expectation questions. Conversely, subjects who have low pro-environmental orientation responded differently when encounter behavioural intention and behavioural expectation questions. These subjects over estimate their likelihood to perform the targeted pro-environmental behaviour when responding to behavioural intention questions, while under estimate it when responding to behavioural expectation questions. It is clear that subjects who have low pro-environmental behaviour were not taking into account the feasibility of performing the pro-environment behaviour. These results provide a basis for marketers and researchers to embrace behavioural expectation as a better predictor of consumers’ adoption of pro-environmental products

AB - Consumers who report their concern about environment do not necessarily purchase proenvironmental products. This attitude-behaviour inconsistency is related to researchers’choice of the predictor of pro-environmental behaviour. This paper aims to compares the predictive accuracy of two immediate predictors of pro-environmental behaviour, behavioural intention and behavioural expectation. Results from an online survey indicate that subjects are generally over estimate their judgment toward performing pro-environmental behaviour when responding to behavioural intention questions. Meanwhile, when responding to behavioural expectation questions, subjects were able to make a better estimation toward their likelihood to perform the targeted pro-environmental behaviour. In a more specific comparison between consumers with high and low pro-environmental orientation, the underlying process differences between behavioural intention and behavioural expectation is evident. Subjects who have high pro-environmental orientation were more “honest” about their environment concern, thus they have stable responses toward behavioural intention and behavioural expectation questions. Conversely, subjects who have low pro-environmental orientation responded differently when encounter behavioural intention and behavioural expectation questions. These subjects over estimate their likelihood to perform the targeted pro-environmental behaviour when responding to behavioural intention questions, while under estimate it when responding to behavioural expectation questions. It is clear that subjects who have low pro-environmental behaviour were not taking into account the feasibility of performing the pro-environment behaviour. These results provide a basis for marketers and researchers to embrace behavioural expectation as a better predictor of consumers’ adoption of pro-environmental products

M3 - Abstract

ER -

Mahardika H, Thomas D, Ewing MT. Predicting consumers pro-environmental behaviour. 2011. Abstract from Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference (ANZMAC 2011), Perth WA, Australia.