Pre-injury health status of major trauma patients with orthopaedic injuries

Asmare Yitayeh Gelaw, Belinda J. Gabbe, Pamela M. Simpson, Christina L. Ekegren

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Background: Pre-injury health status is an important determining factor of long-term outcomes after orthopaedic major trauma. Determining pre-injury health status of major trauma patients with orthopaedic injuries is also important for evaluating the change from pre to post-injury health status. Objectives: Describe pre-injury health statuses reported at three different time points (6, 12 and 24 months) after injury and compare these with Australian normative values; determine the agreement between pre-injury health status collected at multiple time points post-injury; and identify factors associated with reporting better pre-injury health status. Materials and Methods: A registry-based cohort study was conducted. Major trauma patients with orthopaedic injuries captured by the Victorian State Trauma Registry with a date of injury from January 2009 to December 2016 were included. Pre-injury health status (measured using the EuroQol-Visual Analogue Scale (EQ-VAS)), reported 6, 12 and 24 months post-injury, was compared against Australian population normative values. The Bland-Altman method of comparison was used to determine the agreement between pre-injury EQ-VAS scores reported 6 to 12 and 6 to 24 months post-injury. Mixed effects ordinal logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with reporting better pre-injury health status. Results: A total of 3,371 patients were eligible for the study. The median (IQR) pre-injury EQ-VAS score reported 6, 12 and 24 months post-injury was 90 (85–100) out of 100. Participants’ pre-injury EQ-VAS scores reported 6, 12 and 24 months post-injury were significantly higher than Australian population normative values. Pre-injury EQ-VAS scores reported 6 months post-injury agreed with pre-injury EQ-VAS scores reported 12 and 24 months post-injury. A significant association exists between pre-injury health status and age, comorbidities, injury characteristics, socioeconomic status and pre-injury work status. Conclusions: People with orthopaedic major trauma have better pre-injury health compared to the general Australian population. Therefore, population-specific values should be used as baseline measures to evaluate orthopaedic trauma outcomes. Pre-injury health status values reported at three different post-injury time points were comparable. If conducting a retrospective pre-injury health evaluation, researchers need be aware of factors that influence self-reporting of pre-injury health status and the response shift that may happen due to encountering injury.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages9
JournalInjury
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 10 Dec 2019

Keywords

  • Health status
  • Injury
  • Orthopaedic
  • Pre-injury
  • Quality of life
  • Trauma

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